adiabatic system

adiabatic system

[¦ad·ē·ə¦bad·ik ′sis·təm]
(science and technology)
A body or system whose condition is altered without gaining heat from or losing heat to the surroundings.
References in periodicals archive ?
When designing an adiabatic system, careful consideration must be made to the entering air temperature and humidity conditions; since the process occurs at almost constant enthalpy, the air must be warm enough to absorb enough moisture in order to achieve the desired space relative humidity.
Another effect of the compression of a melt is the expected increase in temperature because of the input of work into the system (13-18), For an adiabatic system this relation is called the thennoclastic coefficient:
Solaroli's patented system, which he unsuccessfully pitched to numerous companies before getting a shot with Fountain, creates an adiabatic system -- principles similar to how a refrigerator or air conditioner work.
Adiabatic systems are not new, but until Solaroli's design changes, they were not practical due to early ignition, compression and other problems.
A notable feature of the system is that with a small valve package at each molding machine, the system can modulate the water temperature at each press individually and with up to 40% lower energy than with an adiabatic system plus dedicated chillers at each machine.
The Adiabatic system is environmentally safe with no ozone depleting or toxic chemicals.
Also, the ground below does not accumulate large amounts of water, like other traditional Adiabatic systems.
Unlike isothermal systems that boil water to make steam, adiabatic systems do not boil water to produce steam.
In this case, however, various dynamic features are observed, including the limit cycles and the foci, which are not observed in the adiabatic systems.
But unlike other adiabatic systems, the water mist does not directly contact the cooling coils, so no scale buildup occurs.