adipose fin


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adipose fin

[′ad·ə‚pōs ‚fin]
(vertebrate zoology)
A modified posterior dorsal fin that is fleshy and lacks rays; found in salmon and typical catfishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The adipose fin extends from the posterior end of the rayed dorsal fin to the caudal fin.
TL: total length, AF: base adipose fin, CF: base caudal fin, BL: barbeus length, HL: head length, CL: upper caudal fin lobe length, ID: interorbital distance, BD: maximum body depth, ED: eye depth, BW: mouth width, MD: mouth depth.
4%); dorsal fin yellow-brown with multiple oblique rows of dark pigment; adipose fin brown; pectoral fin translucent with 4-5 diagonal bars of dark brown pigment; pelvic fins golden-yellow with darker pigment between rays; anal fin yellow; caudal fin light brown with 3-5 rows of dark pigmentation spanning both lobes, posterior fringes of fin dark brown.
On the tributaries and mainstem of the Columbia and the Snake, wild fish (with adipose fins intact) must remain in the water
is distinguished from the remaining species of the genus Leporinus by its color pattern of: one longitudinal and discontinuous narrow dark brown stripe running inconspicuously from a vertical through middle of dorsal fin to base of caudal peduncle along lateral line; two or three large dark brown vertically elongated blotches along middle trunk: first at the vertical through dorsal-fin, second anterior to adipose fin and third on the caudal peduncle; mainly in young specimens, 12-13 short transversal dark brown bars meeting small dark brown blotches laterally.
Most are wild fish; only a small percentage are hatchery raised, identifiable by their clipped adipose fin.
Distichodus mossambicus is a distinctive fish, with a deep, compressed body covered with ctenoid scales that also cover the adipose fin.
Scientific monitoring systems - smolt traps, micro tags, genetic marking, adipose fin clipping - should be employed, otherwise all is guesswork, and high-risk strategy.
Next year we'll mark Eagle Lake trout by removing the adipose fin, making it easier for anglers to identify those fish,'' said Eichman.
Catfishes of the highly specialized bagrid genus Bagrichthys Bleeker, 1858, live in large muddy fivers throughout Southeast Asia and are characterised by their elongate and laterally compressed caudal peduncle, the dorsally-directed serrations on the posterior edge of the dorsal-fin spine, gill membranes united at the isthmus, and a long adipose fin without a free posterior margin (Roberts 1989, Mo 1991).
It also has the hallmark of the salmonid family in the adipose fin.