adipose fin

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Related to adipose fins: ventral fin

adipose fin

[′ad·ə‚pōs ‚fin]
(vertebrate zoology)
A modified posterior dorsal fin that is fleshy and lacks rays; found in salmon and typical catfishes.
References in periodicals archive ?
The exception is for fish released in waters, such as the McKenzie, where adipose fin clips are used on hatchery fish to help prevent the harvest of wild fish.
Normally, hatchery fish have clipped adipose fins, which tell anglers the fish are OK to keep.
Another 3,050 salmon with intact adipose fins were released, according to creel surveys.
The 18 coho seized still had intact adipose fins, indicating that they were probably wild and not legal to keep.
The adipose fin is that small, fleshy fin located between a salmon's tail and its dorsal fin.
See page 67 of the 2003 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations for additional details on how to tell one from the other - or if you're not sure what the adipose fin looks like.
While most of the released fish were coho with intact adipose fins, that category also includes fish below the minimum size or hatchery coho released by anglers targeting chinook.
But anglers all along the coast were smiling on opening weekend of the "selective coho season" - so-called because anglers must be selective in their harvest, keeping only hatchery-reared coho with a clipped adipose fin.
To avoid getting ticketed, Day says anglers at the dam are releasing about half of the salmon they reel in because the fish have adipose fins that either were not clipped properly at the hatchery before they were released or have partially "regenerated.
The water's too high" (on the Willamette River below Dexter Dam); "the water's too low" (on sections of the McKenzie River bypassed by Eugene Water & Electric Board "power canals"); the poachers are snagging salmon; and "too many fish have to be released because their adipose fin wasn't clipped properly.
Only fish with hatchery-clipped adipose fins may be retained on the McKenzie.
About the only thing our group found to complain about was the number of fish that had to be released due to what appeared to be either partially clipped or regenerated adipose fins.