adjacent

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adjacent

1. Maths
a. (of a pair of vertices in a graph) joined by a common edge
b. (of a pair of edges in a graph) meeting at a common vertex
2. Geometry the side lying between a specified angle and a right angle in a right-angled triangle

adjacent

References in periodicals archive ?
A contextual response to adjacently established strategic vocabulary, the exterior design interconnects each ROT building through the use of covered pedestrian walkways, trellises and landscaped courtyards.
It is a revelation when compared to Cahn's four-piece Revere service, displayed adjacently.
First, target detection with MNAzymes requires 2 distinct target-binding events, because the 2 partzymes must hybridize adjacently on a target to form an MNAzyme.
Given these large uncertainties, however, the correlation of static and dynamic cushions rankings for individuals is perhaps surprisingly good, with perfect correlations being noted for participants 5, 6, and 7 and the transposition of only two adjacently ranked cushions for participant 8.
It was presented in a unique fashion, with biscuit, topping and fruit coulis all laid out separately and adjacently on the plate.
The IASP World Conference will take place at the Qatar National Convention Centre, which is adjacently located to QSTP, Doha's new cutting-edge green facility in 2014.
The road would facilitate transports adjacently to the Blue Line.
As we would visit a unit, news would travel to adjacently oriented units that would also request our services.
The experiment used a completely randomized design, and each experimental unit was a replicate consisting of eight groups of adjacently caged layer hens fed as one group.
At times, the two will grow adjacently, but those broad, swaying fields lining the Chassahowitzka River and the main marsh arteries are all needle grass.
They had access to 4 feeding troughs placed adjacently (~1 m apart) of which only 3 were used.
Honoring both Sabbath rest and work, Westhelle concludes: "Church is aroused and inflamed by the white fire in the interstices of our ecclesial discourses, offering hope, a hopeful anticipation of the promise of something nearby or at hand, adjacently both ready and at ease" (168).