admiral


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admiral

any of various nymphalid butterflies, esp the red admiral or white admiral

Admiral

 

(from Arabic amir al bahr, “ruler on the sea”), a navy rank. It was first used in Europe in the 12th century in Venice and Genoa and later spread to the navies of other countries. In Russia admiral ranks (admiral general, admiral, vice admiral, and rear admiral) were introduced by Peter I in the late 17th and early 18th centuries. The May 7, 1940, decree of the Presidium of the USSR Supreme Soviet created the following ranks in the USSR Navy: rear admiral, vice admiral, admiral, and admiral of the fleet; and in the navy engineering corps, engineer rear admiral, engineer vice admiral, and engineer admiral. On March 3, 1955, the rank of admiral of the fleet of the Soviet Union replaced the rank of admiral of the fleet, and on April 18, 1962, the rank of admiral of the fleet was reintroduced and added to all those existing.

References in classic literature ?
When a seaman did put up at the Admiral Benbow (as now and then some did, making by the coast road for Bristol) he would look in at him through the curtained door before he entered the parlour; and he was always sure to be as silent as a mouse when any such was present.
On the way to dinner the Admiral showed him where to buy gloves, and made him buy them; where to buy cigars, and made him buy a vast store, some of which he obligingly accepted.
The Admiral hung an ear, and looked up sidelong with a glimmer of suspicion.
The distinguished Admiral had lived through it himself, and was a good judge of what was expected in those days from men and ships.
The admiral desired the flag to be hauled down--hoped it would be perfectly agreeable--and his men stood ready to perform the duty.
The Admiral hated marriage, and thought it never pardonable in a young man of independent fortune.
In a few words he explained his mission, explained in what way he had become the envoy of his royal highness; and saluted, according to their rank and the reception they gave him, the admiral and several of the English noblemen who were grouped around the princesses.
One day last spring, in town, I was in company with two men, striking instances of what I am talking of; Lord St Ives, whose father we all know to have been a country curate, without bread to eat; I was to give place to Lord St Ives, and a certain Admiral Baldwin, the most deplorable-looking personage you can imagine; his face the colour of mahogany, rough and rugged to the last degree; all lines and wrinkles, nine grey hairs of a side, and nothing but a dab of powder at top.
He heard Fanshaw say there was no need to be silly; that not only had Cornish captains been heroes, but that they were heroes still: that near that very spot there was an old admiral, now retired, who was scarred by thrilling voyages full of adventures; and who had in his youth found the last group of eight Pacific Islands that was added to the chart of the world.
The duke had no longer a dwelling-house - that had become useless to an admiral whose place of residence is his ship; he had no longer need of superfluous arms, when he was placed amidst his cannons; no more jewels, which the sea might rob him of; but he had three or four hundred thousand crowns fresh in his coffers.
Thomson moved his chair next to his host's Geraldine's father, Admiral Sir Seymour Conyers, was a very garrulous old gentleman with fixed ideas about everything, a little deaf and exceedingly fond of conversation.
And especially to the Admiral and the Doctor were this closer intimacy and companionship of value.