adoptive immunotherapy

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Related to adoptive transfer: Flow cytometry, transgenic

adoptive immunotherapy

[ə¦däp·tiv ‚im·yə·nō′ther·ə·pē]
(immunology)
The transfer of immunologically competent white blood cells or their precursors into the host.
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T cells in an intrinsic or extrinsic fashion, we performed reciprocal adoptive transfer experiments.
In contrast, an increase in the proportion of Tregs was likely due to a combination of intrinsic and extrinsic influences because the skewed frequency of Tregs was lost in both adoptive transfer scenarios.
Adoptive transfer might be useful in other cancers and in infectious diseases such as AIDS for which functionally active lymphocytes can be selected in vitro.
Treatment of M2 macrophages with PTX-2/SAP prior to adoptive transfer altered M2 macrophage function thereby restoring the ability of these cells to reduce inflammation and fibrosis and was associated with a significant increase in IL-10 production in the lung.
The study shows that adoptive transfer of immunologically trained splenocytes decreased the mortality of the tumor-containing mice.
DCVax(R)-L forms the cornerstone of the treatment regimen, and is complemented by administration of low doses of certain existing approved drugs to help improve the immune system environment, as well as by adoptive transfer of patients' DCVax(R)-L primed T cells.
The second study, which will be a follow-on to the first study but covered by a separate IND filing, will compare two treatment arms continuing further with the drug and DCVax(R)-L regimen, and adding the adoptive transfer of DCVax(R)-L primed, and expanded T cells.
This adoptive transfer vaccine approach is important not only for the long-term benefits it provides, but also for what it doesn't provide -- harmful side effects," said Gary Arendash, Ph.
The clinical importance of T helper stimulation has been shown most clearly by adoptive transfer trials conducted at the National Institutes of Health," explained Dr.
This vaccine strategy is dramatically simpler and less expensive than adoptive transfer.
The experimental technique, known as adoptive transfer, has shown promising results in patients with metastatic melanoma who have not responded to standard treatment.