adsorbate

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adsorbate

[ad′sȯr‚bāt]
(chemistry)
A solid, liquid, or gas which is adsorbed as molecules, atoms, or ions by such substances as charcoal, silica, metals, water, and mercury.
References in periodicals archive ?
The steep concentration profile for adsorption on Sil Z is significant of a quite rapid mass transfer and representative of a good affinity between adsorbent and adsorbate.
For an adsorbate with large or complex structure, the pore size of an adsorbent plays a vital role on the adsorption capacity.
The aim of the adsorption isotherms is to relate the adsorbate concentration in the bulk to the adsorbed amount at the interface.
Pore diameter, which is larger than the size of adsorbate, improves accessibility to internal surface of the adsorbent materials.
Langmuir adsorption equation refer q as the adsorption capacity of adsorbate adsorbed onto activated carbon to form monolayer and b is the empirical constant related to the affinity of the binding site.
The decrease in the rate of adsorption with the progress in the equilibration time may be due to the more availability of adsorption sites initially and are progressively used up with time due to the formation of adsorbate film on the sites of adsorbent and thus resulting in decrease in capability of the adsorbent.
2+], the adsorbate molecules need a certain energy of activation to cross the potential barrier (Panday et al.
QCM devices are highly sensitive to changes of the surface mass loading of adsorbates and the interfacial properties relating to some nonmass response factors of the test solution, such as the density ([rho]), viscosity ([eta]), and conductivity (18-22).
In general, at low concentrations there are sufficient adsorption sites for adsorbates (VOCs), and competitions among molecules for adsorption sites may be neglected.
They combine the surface physical and chemical structure of activated carbons, the surface phenomenon at solid-gas and solid-liquid interfaces, and the activated carbon adsorption of organic and inorganic gaseous adsorbates and solutes from solutions.
An examination of the geometry of the diffraction pattern yields information about the size and type of crystal lattice of the sample, as well as the presence, distribution and orientation of adsorbates on the surface.