Adventurousness


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Related to Adventurousness: affectionateness

Adventurousness

See also Journey, Quest, Wandering.
Adversity (See FAILURE.)
Advice (See COUNSEL.)
Affectation (See PRETENSION.)
Affliction (See SUFFERING.)
Adverse, Anthony
leads adventurous and romantic life in Italy, France, and America in the Napoleonic era. [Am. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 36]
Baggins, Bilbo
hobbit-protagonist; has escapades with dwarfs. [Br. Lit.: The Hobbit]
Blas, Gil
picaresque victimizer and victim who encounters all the social classes of 18th-century Spain. [Fr. Lit.: Gil Blas; Benét, 395]
Bond, James
secret agent 007, whose exploits feature futuristic technology. [Br. Lit.: Herman, 27]
Boob McNutt
schlemiel has wild adventures among fabulous beasts on tropical isles. [Comics: Horn, 125]
Bunny, Benjamin
Peter Rabbit’s thrill-seeking cousin. [Children’s Lit.: The Tale of Benjamin Bunny]
Clarke, Micah
helps in Monmouth’s unsuccessful attempt to wrest the throne from King James. [Br. Lit.: Doyle Micah Clarke in Magill I, 585]
Crusoe, Robinson
experiences adventures among pirates, cannibals, and slavers. [Br. Lit.: Defoe Robinson Crusoe]
Deadwood Dick
hero of Wild West dime novels. [Am. Folklore: Walsh Modern, 115]
Eulenspiegel, Till
wanders the Low Countries, living by his wits and avenging the evil deeds of King Philip. [Belg. Lit.: Benét, 325]
Fabio
19th-century young runaway becomes gaucho; Argentinian Huckleberry Finn. [Arg. Lit.: Don Segundo Sombra]
Fabrizio del Dongo
partisan of Napoleon, involved in love, intrigue, a duel, and ends up as a Carthusian monk. [Fr. Lit.: Stendhal The Charterhouse of Parma in Magill I, 135]
Finn, Huckleberry
19th-century picaresque teenager travels down the Mississippi on a raft. [Am. Lit.: Huckleberry Finn]
Flanders, Moll
amoral adventuress of many liasons. [Br. Lit.: Defoe Moll Flanders in Benét, 678]
Fogg, Phileas
gentleman undertakes world trip on wager. [Fr. Lit.: Around the World in Eighty Days]
Gilliatt
battles storms, disaster, and a giant octopus in order to salvage a ship’s engine and win a bride. [Fr. Lit.: Toilers of the Sea in Magill II, 1037]
Gordon, Flash
constantly launches into apparently hopeless adventures to combat evil powers. [Comics: Berger, 133]
Gulliver, Lemuel
17th-century hero travels to fanciful lands on extraordinary voyages. [Br. Lit.: Gulliver’s Travels]
Hajji Baba
shrewd rascal travels around Persia. [Fr. Lit.: Hajji Baba of Ispahan in Magill I, 343]
Hannay, Richard
traced and hounded by enemies of England, has several narrow escapes. [Br. Lit. and Cinema: Buchan The 39 Steps in Magill I, 972]
Hawkins, Jim
cabin boy on pirate ship. [Br. Lit.: Treasure Island]
Hornblower, Horatio
gallant warship captain in Napoleonic era. [Br. Lit.: Captain Horatio Hornblower]
Huon of Bordeaux
as penance for killing a prince, submits to perilous journey to the East. [Ger. Lit.: Benét, 487; Ger. Opera: Oberon]
Jason
leader of Argonauts in successful quest for the Golden Fleece. [Gk. Legend: Brewer Dictionary, 500]
Kidnapped
caught in the intrigues of Scottish factions, David Balfour and Alan Breck are shipwrecked, escape from the king’s soldiers, and undergo great dangers. [Br. Lit.: R. L. Stevenson Kidnapped]
Kim
orphan wanders streets of India with lama. [Br. Lit.: Kim]
Kon-Tiki
tale of raft trip taken to prove sea-borne migration of peoples and culture. [Pacific Hist.: Kon-Tiki]
Krull, Felix
has adventures in Germany, France, and Portugal under a succession of names and professions. [Ger. Lit.: Mann The Confessions of Felix Krull in Magill III, 218]
Lawrence of Arabia
T. E. Lawrence (1888–1935), legendary hero, led Arab revolt against Turkey. [Br. Hist.: Benét, 572]
Lazarillo de Tormes
16th-century picaresque novel about a runaway youth who lives by his wits serving, in succession, a blind beggar and several unworthy ecclesiastics. [Span. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 415]
Lismahago, Lieutenant Obadiah
19th-century sportsman with quixotic tales. [Br. Lit.: Humphry Clinker, Magill I, 394–397]
Münchhausen, Baron
picaresque traveler and teller of tall tales. [Ger. Lit.: Baron Mücnchhausen]
Mowgli
infant lost in the Indian forest is brought up by a wolf pack. [Children’s Lit.: Kipling The Jungle Books in Magill I, 461]
Nautilus
submarine in which its builder, Captain Nemo, cruises around the world. [Fr. Lit.: Jules Verne Twenty Thousand Leagues Under the Sea]
Nemo, Captain
travels throughout the world in the Nautilus, a submarine of his own invention. [Fr. Lit.: Jules Verne Twenty Thousand Leagues under the Sea]
Odysseus
(Ulysses) varied adventures after the Trojan War kept him away from Ithaca for ten years. [Gk. Myth.: Odyssey]
Pickle, Peregrine
young rogue experiences escapades in England and on the Continent. [Br. Lit.: Peregrine Pickle in Magill I, 731-4]
Polo, Marco
13th-century Venetian merchant; brought Oriental wonders to Europe. [Eur. Hist.: Bishop, 222–224]
Pym, Arthur Gordon
journeys include mutiny, shipwreck, savages, and the supernatural. [Am. Lit.: Poe, “The Narrative of Arthur Gordon Pym” in Magill I, 640–643]
Quatermain, Allan
undertakes a dangerous African expedition in search of a lost diamond mine. [Br. Lit.: H. Rider Haggard King Solomon’s Mines in Magill I, 475]
Random, Roderick
exiled for killing in a duel, goes to sea, endures shipwreck and battles, and discovers his wealthy father. [Br. Lit.: Roderick Random, Haydn & Fuller, 644]
Ruslan
undergoes many adventures to regain his abducted bride. [Russ. Poetry: Ruslan and Lyudmilla in Haydn & Fuller, 653]
Sawyer, Tom
classic 19th-century adventuresome, all-American boy. [Am. Lit.: Tom Sawyer]
Simplicissimus
from callowness to audacity on 17th-century battlefields. [Ger. Lit.: Simplicissimus]
Sindbad
the Sailor has scores of adventures in the course of seven voyages. [Arab. Lit.: Arabian Nights]
Tartarin
19th-century French Quixote acts out his dreams of travel. [Fr. Lit.: Tartarin de Tarascon]
Tarzan
jungle man leads adventurous life. [Am. Lit.: Tarzan of the Apes]
Time Machine, The
inventor travels into future; sees degeneration of life. [Br. Lit.: The Time Machine]
Tom Jones
picaresque novel of a young man in 18th-century England. [Br. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 745]
References in periodicals archive ?
Shloer has also become well attuned to consumer adventurousness and, following the success of its Rose variety two years ago which, it says, "demonstrates that consumers have an unquenchable thirst for innovative new flavours", it launched limited edition Shloer Summer Fruit Punch launched in April, and Shloer Berry Punch, which has made its debut for the festive season.
Tablet contributing editor Rachel Shukert, for example, describes, in Everything Is Going To Be Great: An Underfunded, Overexposed European Grand Tour (Harper Perennial, July), a European sojourn motivated less by any specific problems she faced in Americathough, to be fair, Shukert did grow up Jewish in Omaha, Nebraska, which is nobody's idea of a rollicking good timethan by a general spirit of post-college adventurousness, and, more concretely, by a "non-paying, non-speaking" role in a traveling theater production.
When he brings the San Francisco Symphony to the Kennedy Center here Wednesday, the AoradicalAo piece on the program is his own adaptation of LisztAAEs AoTasso, Lament and TriumphAo, in which he augments the orchestration (not actually by Liszt) in ways he feels are in keeping with the adventurousness of LisztAAEs other works.
We need more risk and more adventurousness, not less.
Perhaps the problem is that Foster's compositions and choice of viewpoint have yet to catch up with the adventurousness of his palette.
They share the words of women from the study, who describe having sex for reasons of pleasure, love, the thrill of conquest, jealousy, a sense of duty, sexual adventurousness, to get something, health, for self-esteem, and deceptive, abusive, or negative reasons.
But I showed it to them nonetheless; and Laura Harris, my publisher, Christine Alesich and Dmetri Kakmi, my editors, and the whole wonderful Penguin team have my eternal gratitude, for their enthusiasm, nurturing support, and sheer artistic adventurousness.
The work of Atholl Anderson is certainly not unfamiliar to anyone who regularly reads Archaeology in Oceania, but this volume demonstrates with ease how the energy, vision, knowledge, and adventurousness of one person can influence the paths of many.
Drawing on the willingness to relocate and personality literatures, these factors include manager adventurousness and perceived importance of destination country.
A spokesman for the researchers told the Daily Mail: "Second-born children showed increases in traits like adventurousness and independence across adolescence, whereas in firstborns, these traits did not change much over time.
Getting the clientele to match their spirit of adventurousness wasn't plain sailing for the river-view restaurant.