adverse possession


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Financial, Wikipedia.
Related to adverse possession: prescriptive easement

adverse possession

Occupation of property by one not the true owner, openly, notoriously, and continuously. See statute of limitations; squatter’s right; proscription.
References in periodicals archive ?
b) Land Subject to Adverse Possession (and against Which the Limitation Period Can Run)
On April 16, 2003, the Alaska Senate Judiciary Committee met to discuss Senate Bill 93, the goal of which was to "repeal the Doctrine of Adverse Possession in the case of 'bad faith' trespassers, giving private property owner's [sic] security in knowing their property cannot be taken by squatters.
The Land Registration Act 2002 has reduced the required period to 10 years - the old rules still apply if a person had adverse possession for more than 12 years before the act came into force on October 13, 2003.
The land has been used as a private garden for around 30 years, and the report added: "There may be the potential for the owner to claim adverse possession of the land which could result in them obtaining title to the land.
Prescriptive easements are often erroneously referenced as easements arising by adverse possession, and, while many elements of prescriptive easements are akin to adverse possession claims, there are significant differences.
Adverse possession is when an individual possesses property owned
It's still quite legal to obtain title to somebody else's property by occupying and improving it through adverse possession laws.
He was apprised that after vacating CDA land from the adverse possession, barbed wire is being erected around the vacated land for its fencing.
In 2014, David Mitchell dealt with an adverse possession claim concerning part of a cricket ground.
The CDA management has also directed to carry out day and night vigilance of the capital city so as to ensure that the encroachers could not occupy the CDA land and to protect the area evacuated from adverse possession, particularly during the recent operation against the illegal slums.
This article uses the jurisprudence concerning expropriation and adverse possession to show that Canadian courts have in fact developed their own definition of ownership--one that is not reflected in the property theory discourse.
These rules include eminent domain, improving trespasser, adverse possession, and nuisance abatement and property rehabilitation statutes.