aerate


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aerate

To introduce air into soil or water by natural or artificial means.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bliss said he's following the advice of agronomy professors from the University of New Hampshire and the University of Rhode Island, who told him the later you aerate, the better for both the turf and drainage through the winter.
I aerate it once a week, all the time adding new debris on top.
On heavy types, farmyard manure or stable manure is your best bet, as my veggie-growing favourite, pig manure, tends to be heavier and so may not help to aerate much at all.
Mix the materials in your bins about once a month to aerate.
Be very careful if you must aerate an older pond having deep sediment which has become anaerobic.
The colors--consistently intense, even fulsome, with lots of purples and oranges, like a layered cocktail of wine, sherbet, and nail polish--tend to lighten and aerate at the top of each work, suggesting sky over land.
Remember to re-seed, de-thatch or aerate your lawn right now.
PLANET Members to Lime, Aerate, Prune, Plant, and Cable Trees at Arlington National Cemetery on Monday, July 22, 2013, for the 17th Annual Renewal & Remembrance Event
stored in wooden bins, you might have to remove it and aerate it before returning it to the bin.
Not only do they break down and carry away dung, but in the process they also aerate soil and enhance the ability of water to percolate into the ground.
Originally introduced on July 2, 2003, Iced Shaken Refreshments are handcrafted, freshly brewed iced tea and coffee beverages shaken with ice to uniformly mix sweeteners and aerate the beverage for a light, frothy, refreshing drink.
There is even a shorter stem if you choose to aerate by the glass.