aerodynamic load

aerodynamic load

[‚e·ro·dī′nam·ik ′lōd]
(fluid mechanics)
References in periodicals archive ?
5 times, or 150 percent, of the highest aerodynamic load that the jet could ever be expected to see in the entire lifetime of the 787 fleet.
As forward speed increases and the canard and tail pick up the aerodynamic load of the aircraft, the exhaust is gradually diverted completely through a nozzle at the back of the aircraft, propelling it even faster forward and allowing the rotor to stop and lock into place for fixed- wing flight.
Previous physical testing had shown that the horizontal stabilizer meets its certification requirement to withstand 150 percent of the maximum aerodynamic load it ever could encounter in flight.
The aim was to study the flow around the vehicle in unsteady wind scenario and sheltered vehicle's aerodynamic load development.
Brown biology graduate student Jorn Cheney said aerodynamic performance depends upon wing shape, asserting that the shape of a membrane wing might initially begin flat but as soon as it starts producing lift it's not going to remain flat because it has to deform in response to that aerodynamic load.
Typically starting/operating the motor with a VFD mitigates many of the problems that can occur when starting the fan across the line with a weak power supply or starting the fan against an opposing aerodynamic load.
The relatively small size and short response time of multi body aerodynamic load calculation(MALC)analysis permits the development of an associated control system to achieve better design.
periodical (harmonic) aerodynamic load components ([F.
To meet the certification requirements the wings have to withstand loads up to 150% of the highest aerodynamic load that the aircraft could ever be expected to experience.
Test results replicating the road and aerodynamic load of a Hyperdrive-equipped large luxury car produced hydrocarbon levels of 0.
where the last four variables are the so-called aerodynamic-lag states used to describe the "state" of the fluid as a result of aerodynamic load action on the airfoil.
Too much back-and-forth motion can result in too much aerodynamic load which could seriously damage an aircraft's vertical tail.