affect

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affect

Psychol the emotion associated with an idea or set of ideas

Affect

 

an emotional state that is characterized by a turbulent and relatively short course (rage, anger, horror, and so forth). The manifestation of affect is linked with sharply expressed changes both in the autonomous motor sphere (inhibition or overexcitation and disorder in the coordination of movement) and in the sphere of vegetative reactions (change of pulse and breathing, spasms of the peripheral blood vessels, the appearance of so-called cold sweat, and so forth). Affect can disturb the normal course of the higher psychic processes of perception and thinking and can cause a decrease in consciousness or its loss. Under certain conditions, negative affect can be fixated in the memory in the form of so-called affective complexes. These traces of past affective states can become reactivated in the present under the influence of irritants associated with the situation that caused the affect. Another important peculiarity of affect is that with the repetition of a negative affect which is caused by the same factor or analogous factors, its manifestation can be reinforced (the phenomenon of “accumulation” of affect), sometimes creating the impression of pathological conduct. The presence of strong affective states in a person at the time when he commits an action is regarded by the law as a circumstance that decreases the degree of his responsibility for these actions.

A. N. LEONT’EV

affect

[′af‚ekt]
(psychology)
Conscious awareness of feelings; mood.
References in periodicals archive ?
delivered affectingly and with great persuasive eloquence," that Florence definitively voted (in an act sprinkled with the word "honor" or its derivativ es) [46] to build a new town hall -- the town hall that had not been present, that had been embarrassingly and shamefully absent at the reception of the illustrious guests.
The Tempest's enlightened heads of government and state -- Prospero like John Howard was involuntarily out of office for some time, while Alonso grew within office -- embraced `reconciliation' firmly and affectingly, clearly with audience support.
But there's mystery too, most affectingly in Gayle Bailey's long, centrally placed solo, where she strides, arms up-stretched, like a goddess summoning celestial powers, with William Crowley as her male counterpart in the solo that follows.
Jonathan Vining supplied a beautiful contrast in his gentle solo interludes, and the final section, "How good and how pleasant it is for brethren to dwell together in unity," a serene allusion to the sentiments of Schiller and Beethoven, was affectingly sung by the unaccompanied choir making a highly appropriate note on which to finish.
Nicely understated performances in a mild comedy that affectingly leaves the human condition in credit during the recession.
In her portrayal, Sunny Thompson convincingly recreates the voice, singing style, movement and, most affectingly, the vulnerability of Marilyn.
Partnering her was the more established Sarah Coburn, whose Juliette was exquisitely sung and affectingly acted.
In rewarding those who seek, Church speaks affectingly of a quest for the metaphysical.
One for Sorrow, Christopher Barzak's lovely, melancholy, offbeat first novel, affectingly captures the emotional centrifuge that is adolescence, with sex and longing the fixed axes around which everything else spins.
To my mind, it is more in Auden's poems that extend "our knowledge of good and evil" that Auden's faith resonates most affectingly.
s Jewish community so affectingly persuasive is, for one, her incorporation of the long and plagued history of Jewish life in German lands and its tenuous renewal -- as exemplified in H.
Not only was the lawyer for the defense criticized for his "effeminate" histrionics in court (Erskine fainted repeatedly at key junctures in his pleading); but certain women were trotted out at dramatic moments during arguments: the prosecutor's anxious wife and children, in one rather ludicrous instance, and, more affectingly, the defendant Thomas Hardy's wife, who died giving birth while he was in prison.