affectivity

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Related to affective: psychomotor, affective disorder, effective, affective domain, affective learning, Affective Behavior

affectivity

[a‚fek′tiv·əd·ē]
(psychology)
The state of being susceptible to emotional stimuli.
References in periodicals archive ?
Understanding how affective priming can alter this perceived relationship may also elucidate how it impacts other areas of an individual's life.
However, there are challenges in facilitating the attainment of desired affective attributes in learners (Buissink-Smith, Mann, & Shephard, 2011), and questions remain about measuring student learning in the affective domain.
Both organisational tenure and professional tenure were used as control variables and the three different foci of affective commitments (i.
Can mindfulness meditation increase awareness and the ability to teach in the affective domain among academic staff?
The results showed that people with high scores for affective empathy had greater grey matter density in the insula, a region found right in the 'middle' of the brain.
As noted above, we could have made a more optimal selection of interaction situations to improve affective involvement.
The vignettes were taken from the ones used by Karniol and Koren (1987) to assess children's affective predictions in self and other.
HMM [5], based on an affective model, applies the concept of affective office and sentiment office to constraint the initial value, so as to fit itself into different characteristics.
LeBlanc and Gallavan (2009) provide us with a strong collection of essays that explore the importance of the affective dimension of the educational process.
In the affective domain, they perform employability skills daily as evidenced by being on time, getting along with others, and spending time on task.
As these two figures show / illustrate, students' motivation and economic status about education and English, it can be concluded that these 2 factors as affective and social ones, respectively have a great influence on learning.
Lewis and Weigert (1985), in their paper explained about the sociological foundations of trust wherein they divided the multifaceted construct of trust into cognitive, affective and behavioral.