affective disorder


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Related to affective disorder: Schizoaffective disorder, Bipolar affective disorder

affective disorder

[ə¦fek·tiv dis′ȯrd·ər]
(psychology)
Any of a group of disorders in which there is a prominent and persistent disturbance of mood and a full syndrome of associated symptoms, such as depressive disorders or bipolar disorder. Also known as mood disorder.
References in periodicals archive ?
Clinically tested to significantly relieve seasonal affective disorder symptoms in nine out of ten study participants, the Valkee user base has already grown to tens of thousands of people in 20+ countries.
Undesirable life events and low family cohesion also were associated with affective disorders and with any psychiatric disorder at baseline, but not at follow-up--after controlling for gender, race, and socioeconomic status.
Seasonal affective disorder is a serious and often under-diagnosed form of depression that affects millions of people each year in the United States," said Norman E.
In the last several years, researchers around the world have found that people who suffer from seasonal affective disorder (SAD), which throws them into a full-blown depressio during the same two or three months every winter, often feel better after sitting in front of bright lights.
Worst-hit are those who suffer from Seasonal Affective Disorder.
The season of birth may affect the development of seasonal affective disorder, reported Edda Pjrek, M.
On the other hand, if the blues last for months, chances are it isn't the holiday blues, but a medical condition known as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD).
In the more sympathetic and caring days of the millennium, the dark gloom that shrouds us when New Year is over has been given its own name - season affective disorder - or, to put it more simply, SAD.
Nearly 70 percent of the artists have some type of affective disorder, notes Akiskal.
When Daylight Savings Time ends on October 27, many people will really feel the symptoms of a form of depression which may be overlooked by many health professionals, called Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD), a disorder that strikes an estimated 35 million Americans each fall and winter.
In a number of studies, artificial bright lights have eased these symptoms of winter depression, also known as seasonal affective disorder (SAD) (SN: 3/9/85, p.