affect

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affect

Psychol the emotion associated with an idea or set of ideas

Affect

 

an emotional state that is characterized by a turbulent and relatively short course (rage, anger, horror, and so forth). The manifestation of affect is linked with sharply expressed changes both in the autonomous motor sphere (inhibition or overexcitation and disorder in the coordination of movement) and in the sphere of vegetative reactions (change of pulse and breathing, spasms of the peripheral blood vessels, the appearance of so-called cold sweat, and so forth). Affect can disturb the normal course of the higher psychic processes of perception and thinking and can cause a decrease in consciousness or its loss. Under certain conditions, negative affect can be fixated in the memory in the form of so-called affective complexes. These traces of past affective states can become reactivated in the present under the influence of irritants associated with the situation that caused the affect. Another important peculiarity of affect is that with the repetition of a negative affect which is caused by the same factor or analogous factors, its manifestation can be reinforced (the phenomenon of “accumulation” of affect), sometimes creating the impression of pathological conduct. The presence of strong affective states in a person at the time when he commits an action is regarded by the law as a circumstance that decreases the degree of his responsibility for these actions.

A. N. LEONT’EV

affect

[′af‚ekt]
(psychology)
Conscious awareness of feelings; mood.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ellis, maybe the best-known writer covered here and typically dismissed as the tasteless (but very profitable) creation of intensive hype, becomes, in the first of three chapters devoted to him, a voice of "puritan disgust," his novels jeremiads bemoaning the affectless "spectacle" of postmodern consumerism, its "depthlessness, centrelessness and cultural schizophrenia.
Scully's works of the '70s focus on rigid geometric abstraction characterized by nearly affectless surfaces and subdued color.
The setting is strangely airless, a spatiotemporal vacuum that indicates nothing of its location; the music is audible only to those on screen as they weave about in a kind of trance-induced shuffle, an affectless ten-minute performance that loops repeatedly when projected.
Nonetheless, Maggi succeeds in defining as a religious writer a man whose images of sodomy, coprophilia, and affectless sexual cruelty made him the bane of Italy's Roman Catholic Church and socialist government.
Such technologization may ultimately render human beings as affectless as aliens, for Dark Knight claims: "I also have not felt my emotions since the attacks started in 1998" (Dark Knight 2008).
At once tragic and affectless, these thorny images might also be read as metaphors for Los Angeles and its culture of fame, which tends toward a strange mixture of exhibitionism and isolation.
Thus, with the appearance of Godwin's three lines, the meaning of the seemingly affectless presentation becomes entirely dependent on the act of reading; only knowledge of the context and of Godwin's account in the Memoirs allows us to interpret it as the language of powerful emotion.
These are almost always quiet listeners, seemingly affectless, even disengaged.
The kidnapping of his son, the devolution of his marriage, his refusal to return a Nazi decoration, the delivery of an inflammatory speech at the height of the interventionist debate in 1941: these episodes demonstrate a remarkably similar pattern, that is, a remote and affectless response to criticism and disagreement, a growing insistence upon the rectitude of his actions, together with a grim resoluteness and rigid perseverance.
On one of her many solo jaunts, she runs into billionaire Will Stacks (Jamie Foxx), an affectless, Bloombergian cellphone titan in the midst of a mayoral campaign.
These two contemplators of time and the infinite, it turns out, are artists Charlotte Posenenske (1930-1985) and Wlodzimierz Borowski (1930-2008)--their identities indicated, eerily, by masks that transform their visages into affectless screens--and the strikingly beautiful landscape through which they walk is that of the afterlife.
273), the world survives a nuclear war only in the form of pale, affectless neo-humans created from genetic blueprints of their more savage, more vigorous, and more passionate antecedents.