afferent


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afferent

[′af·ə·rənt]
(physiology)
Conducting or conveying inward or toward the center, specifically in reference to nerves and blood vessels.
References in periodicals archive ?
EAI can develop by the afferent signals directly affecting the M1 neurons or indirectly through a sensory-motor short cycle.
Physical therapy recognizes the term "fatigue process of the AS afferent fibers" through axonal blockage (repetitive, high-frequency stimuli) as well as neuropeptide transmitters release (direct and modulated current) followed by pain transfer blockage on the peripheral and spinal level.
Under terms of the agreement, Merck, through a subsidiary, will acquire all outstanding stock of Afferent in exchange for an upfront payment of USD 500m in cash.
It is hypothesized that BTX inhibits NDO at both the efferent and afferent limb of the micturition reflex by two entirely different pathways [26].
The report provides brief overview of Afferent Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
Synbiotic nourishment research by Bengmark supports my earlier synbiotic nutrient research on the importance of biomolecular nutrient and cell polarity formats that are critical to adequately nourish stem cell niches, the gut habitat, and afferent regenerative functions.
25) These changes in spindle behavior represent inaccuracies in the proprioceptive information they provide because the afferent inflow does not represent the actual position of the vertebra.
This report is built using data and information sourced from Global Markets Direct's proprietary databases, Afferent Pharmaceuticals, Inc.
The afferent limb of the neobladder, into which the uretero-ileal anastomoses are later performed, is positioned on the right hand side of the pelvis, and is not detubularized.
Although first reported in 1881, afferent and efferent loop obstructions have been better understood since the 1950s (1) following the popularity of Billroth II gastrectomy with gastrojejunostomy (Fig.
In their new study, Sliman Bensmaia from the University of Chicago, two former undergraduates and a postdoctoral scholar in his lab-Matthew Best, Emily Mackevicius and Hannes Sl - found that the skin is also highly sensitive to vibrations, and that these vibrations produce corresponding oscillations in the afferents, or nerves, that carry information from the receptors to the brain.
neuronal afferent elements influence gustatory function.