affinity


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affinity

1. similarity in structure, form, etc., between different animals, plants, or languages
2. Chem
a. the tendency for two substances to combine; chemical attraction
b. a measure of the tendency of a chemical reaction to take place expressed in terms of the free energy change.
3. Biology a measure of the degree of interaction between two molecules, such as an antigen and antibody or a hormone and its receptor

Affinity

(religion, spiritualism, and occult)

Astrologers use the term affinity to refer to compatibility between certain planets or signs. It is also used to denote attraction between people whose charts interact harmoniously and magnetically with each other.

affinity

[ə′fin·əd·ē]
(chemistry)
The extent to which a substance or functional group can enter into a chemical reaction with a given agent. Also known as chemical affinity.
(computer science)
A specific relationship between data processing elements that requires one to be used with the other, where a choice might otherwise exist.
(immunology)
The strength of the attractive forces between an antigen and an antibody.
References in periodicals archive ?
In most cases, affinity partners pay a royalty to CalCPA for using CalCPA's name, staff time spent on the program and access to CalCPA's membership list.
McCormally, TEI's Executive Director, "The RIA-TEI affinity relationship benefits the Institute's members in at least three materials way.
This important lease signing by such a leading corporation as Affinity Federal Credit Union is an affirmation of the desirability of Mountain View Corporate Center.
Under the affinity credit card program, the bank processed applications, produced credit cards, processed transactions, generated statements and processed payments; the alumni association did none of this work.
The model also predicts that as the response nears maturity and antibodies emerge with relatively high affinity, more mutation trials are required to produce a new generation of antibodies with still higher affinity -- a trend Kauffman likens to a law of diminishing returns.