affirmative


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Related to affirmative: Affirmative Covenants

affirmative

1. Logic
a. (of a categorial proposition) affirming the satisfaction by the subject of the predicate, as in all birds have feathers; some men are married
b. not containing negation
2. Logic an affirmative proposition
References in classic literature ?
Things are said to be opposed in four senses: (i) as correlatives to one another, (ii) as contraries to one another, (iii) as privatives to positives, (iv) as affirmatives to negatives.
Opposites in the sense of 'privatives' and 'positives' are' blindness' and 'sight'; in the sense of affirmatives and negatives, the propositions 'he sits', 'he does not sit'.
It would be superfluous, therefore, to enter into a proof of the affirmative.
The king's request had undoubtedly been acceded to by an affirmative sign, for in firm, sonorous accents, which vibrated in the depths of Athos's heart, the king began his speech, explaining his conduct and counseling the welfare of the kingdom.
This, then, was my first glimpse of the garden; but I had not time to look long, the portress, after having answered in the affirmative my question as to whether her mistress was at home, opened the folding-doors of a room to the left, and having ushered me in, closed them behind me.
At the very instant he did this and uttered those words, Pierre felt that the question of his wife's guilt which had been tormenting him the whole day was finally and indubitably answered in the affirmative.
For some of us - certainly for me - the idea that affirmative action has evolved into a system of different standards for people is something I never, ever thought was what affirmative action meant.
People may not support affirmative action because they're concerned about their own group's well-being," he says.
She was a member of the last class admitted to Boalt under affirmative action and a leading organizer in student campaigns to revive it.
The Clinton administration, which claimed to be in favor of affirmative action, attempted to "mend it" so as not to "end it" (affirmative action).
What would happen if a university's class-based affirmative action program looked beyond just income to factors like concentration of poverty, wealth, and family structure?
In Richard Nixon and the Rise of Affirmative Action: The Pursuit of Racial Equality in an Era of Limits, Kevin Yuill wrestles with an interesting and underexplored question: "Why was President Richard M.