affordance


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affordance

(graphics)
A visual clue to the function of an object.
References in periodicals archive ?
As with the opening shots of the fences, the visual affordance of the cage itself as a permeable barrier becomes a key feature of the image.
Ultimately, such technologies have affordances that can assist certain competencies and constrain others.
While our general point is that attention needs to be paid to what Ann Ardis has signaled as "the unique affordances and deep cultural anxieties raised by the rapid expansion and transformation of print media during this period" (1) in relation to other media forms, we also acknowledge the need for what Ardis calls, after William Uricchio, the "mundane specificity of historical practices of print media" (quoted in Ardis 1).
Indeed, perceiving the other as either open or closed to sexual contact is likely to be sufficient to inform the actor regarding the key affordance, or whether a sexual opportunity is available.
What are the affordances of the use of images as a tool for students learning environmental science content?
So it seems that for a rich view, the analyst provides the state of art, the user provides the affordance perspective and management provide the goals.
The possibility is there in Shakespeare, Lupton suggests, especially viewed through those versions of consent at the margins of the Lockean project and entailing a logic and a temporality distinct from the logic and time of contract: the model of "ecological affordances," for instance, Lupton sees at work in The Taming of the Shrew, the existential dimension of medical consent adumbrated in All's Well That Ends Well, the promise of political universalism harbored in Caliban's imagined legal minority.
The affordance has been promulgated by the psychologist Gibson as the perceptual core of this inventive process.
The structured assessment instrument used was based on Burke's retail shoppability framework: transparency, affordance, relevance, convenience and cnjoyment.
Following Gibson's definition, an affordance is an opportunity for action, and the design of a new digital affordance provides people with a tool that was not previously available.
Significantly, an affordance of this change is the emergence of new forms of computer-mediated communication and the increasing prevalence of 'multimodal literacies' that draw on a variety of modalities, including speech, writing, image, gesture and sound (Hull and Nelson 2005).
Due to affordance variation, the OL and F2F environments in which teacher training occurs may differentially impact the teachers' abilities to transfer their learning and integrate technology into their classrooms because "knowledge is situated, being in part a product of the activity, context and culture in which it is developed and used" (Brown et al.