afterimage


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afterimage

[′af·tər‚im·əj]
(neuroscience)
A visual sensation occurring after the stimulus to which it is a response has been removed.
References in periodicals archive ?
Then, as though the textual structure itself were recreating the double temporality of an afterimage, we get a longer, second version of that moment, one that stretches it out over the time of a more detailed description.
As a result, the content is viewed as a distinct randomly patterned area and the background is perceived as a smooth gray area owing to the afterimage effect.
However, DOCOMO's solution uses a largely hollow display that is exceptionally lightweight and allows air to flow through it, yet it still achieves the illusion of a solid display by creating an afterimage effect with rapidly spinning LEDs.
His new book, Afterimage of the Revolution: Cumann na nGaedheal and Irish Politics, 1922-1932, has emerged after years of deep thought, enabling him to place the treaty and the party's self-conception into broader perspective through close reading of public speeches (in the Dail and on the hustings), letters, and internal party memoranda.
You have the impression of the landscape almost as an X-ray, leaving an afterimage in the eye.
Zahid Chaudhary explains this brilliantly in Afterimage of Empire:
In the study, participants either devoted their full attention to a part of a screen where a half-black, half-white circle would cause an afterimage, or had their attention distracted by a counting job.
LG's IPS panels are also noticed for their excellent restoring force of liquid crystal, which ensure no afterimage even at the screen touches.
Washington, Nov 9 (ANI): Our brain forms 'complementary' afterimage after eyes stop looking at objects, Japanese researchers say.
Instead of remaining the afterimage of industrial expansion, the neighborhood could be a place where people come to test new ideas.
She is a regular contributor to Exposure Journal and Afterimage Magazine.
The inclusion of engravings from the nineteenth century adds to the historic flavor of the entries--after all, many are drawn from that rich period of psychoneurological inquiry--but the handful of entries named for Bohemian physiologist Johannes Evangelista Purkyne (Purkinje afterimage, Purkinje effect, Purkinje figure, etc.