aggradation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

aggradation

[‚ag·rə′dā·shən]
(geology)
(hydrology)
A process of shifting equilibrium of stream deposition, with upbuilding approximately at grade.

aggradation

The addition of a material to the earth’s surface to promote the uniformity of a grade or slope.
References in periodicals archive ?
Aggradation has been severely limited by dams, levees, and embankments that trap silt and starve deltas of new sediments.
Outwash deposits are widespread in the lowlands of the North and South islands; we refer to these herein as aggradation gravels.
the river), and she credited tribal evidence that aggradation could be
It is apparent that considerable aggradation has occurred in the upper reaches of the reservoir (Fig.
Aggradation, the next phase of ecosystem development, is a period of time in excess of 100 years when total biomass-the sum of all living and once-living matter, from tree limbs to termites-is being built.
Improve system efficiency by reducing the amount of channel aggradation each year;
The large seventeenth-century El Ninos registered in the Palmyra cotals may account for the increased sedimentation and shoreline aggradation observed archaeologically (Allen 2009; Aswani & Allen 2009).
covered with a mixture of loamy alluvium derived from a mixture of quarzo-feldspathic sediments, loess, and tephra (<15 000 years BP) overlying river aggradation gravels, and having flat to gently sloping topography; and an upper terrace (240-300m a.
locality S-15) where riparian habitat had been eliminated due to erosion or aggradation resulting from flooding following forest fire.
Early sedimentation probably represents aggradation in response to estuarine back flooding of westward flowing rivers during the rise in the Lake Michigan water levels from the Chippewa low to the Nipissing high.
The flashy flow and rapid aggradation of the Little River Formation drainage channels are indicated by a sigmoidal barform preserved at 95 m (Fig.
Sedimentation in these entrenched floodplains was also influenced by sea-level fluctuation during the Holocene, causing increased aggradation and formation of large fluvial lakes and swamps (Singh 2001).