agony in the garden


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agony in the garden

Christ confronts His imminent death. [N.T.: Matthew 26:36–45; Mark 14:32–41]
References in periodicals archive ?
Painting: The Agony in the Garden, by the Master of Vyssi Brod (Hohenfurth) (14th c.
With regard to the article by Jeannette Cooperman in the March 26 issue ("Going beyond the kiddie version of God"), it occurred to me some time ago that in the biblical account of the agony in the Garden of Gethsemane, if the apostles accompanying Jesus were indeed asleep, how could anyone have reported what had happened to Jesus?
The image suggests to the reader the idea of interpreting the events of Christ's life in the light of other events; for example, Jesus' questioning of his disciples about his identity (16:13) and his similar question to the Pharisees (22:41), or the temptation in the desert in the light of the agony in the garden.
The temptation in the desert and the agony in the garden taken together teach us to place no store in our present circumstances.
The images on the windows include John the Baptist, the baptism of Jesus, the Sermon on the Mount and the Agony in the Garden.
The painting, The Agony in the Garden, was included as a loan in the largest display of modern works from the city's collection, held in the Gas Hall early last year.
The Agony in the Garden was painted in the late 1930s and reflects Burra's response to the Spanish Civil War, which proved a turning point in his art towards a more sombre style.
The washing of the feet in commemoration of the Last Supper, staying up with Jesus and praying through the agony in the garden, and the Pesame--accompanying Mary after the Crucifixion--are rituals that also draw us into the experience of suffering.
Episodes leading up to the crucifixion become "snapshot" emblems: the agony in the garden, Judas' kiss, Pilate's hands being washed, Peter arguing with the servant girl.
In the case of Jesus' agony in the garden, even the apostles fell asleep.