agoraphobia

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agoraphobia

a pathological fear of being in public places, often resulting in the sufferer becoming housebound

agoraphobia

[ə‚gȯr·ə′fōb·ē·ə]
(psychology)
Abnormal fear of open places.
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References in periodicals archive ?
PCT includes psychoeducation, cognitive strategies, and exposure-based procedures designed to reduce fear of somatic sensations and agoraphobic situations.
Williams' group examined self-reports of the thoughts and feelings of 74 agoraphobic adults as they drove alone or sat in a dark closet with the door closed for up to 20 minutes.
I'm an agoraphobic, and yet they were accusing me of being some sort of raving loony, shouting at people with my son attacking them.
Revealing more about his tryst with the role, he said that it is very difficult to play an agoraphobic, especially with a baby.
THIS instalment of the Scream comedy trilogy with David Arquette and Neve Campbell, has heroine Sidney Prescott in hiding after surviving enough psycho-killer ordeals to make anyone agoraphobic.
Butler splits himself well between his two characters and Foster is hilarious, playing an agoraphobic, compulsive obsessive who almost hyperventilates when she runs out of antiseptic hand wash.
THE agoraphobic mother of reality TV star Kerry Katona left her house for the first time in two years yesterday - to be sentenced for benefit fraud.
Combining a blind girl with a short fuse, an agoraphobic cellist, a barely competent guide dog, two oversexed possums and a caged hermit crab who thinks he's Steve McQueen in The Great Escape, Silvey gives readers a story of redemption, human connection and maybe love.
Drama about the friendship between three twenty somethings - a pair of hospital workers and an agoraphobic, who also happen to be a vampire, werewolf and ghost respectively.
A printout of the DSM description of panic and agoraphobic disorders is valuable during the learning phase.
Playing Edna Turnblad, the agoraphobic housewife-turned-proud celebrity mom inhabited on-screen by Divine, Harvey Fierstein gives a performance that is both clownishly broad and impressively nuanced.
Somehow, though - with help from the agoraphobic across the courtyard (Dianne Wiest) and a quartet of differently abled ``video night'' buddies - Sam brings Lucy up to be a bright, happy 7-year-old (played by the energetic Dakota Fanning).