agrimony


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agrimony

(ăg`rĭmō'nē), any plant of the genus Agrimonia, perennials of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
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 family) native to north temperate zones, to Brazil, and to Africa. They are found wild in the N and central United States. Agrimony is sometimes cultivated in herb gardens for its small yellow flowers and aromatic leaves, used for an astringent tea. A compound derived from agrimony, agrimophol, is used as an anthelmintic. Agrimony is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
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agrimony

agrimony

Yellow flowers on a stick. Prickly burrs that stick to clothes. Astringent. Leaf tea or cold infusion is used for jaundice and other liver ailments, colds, diarrhea, mouthwash, skin issues, ulcers, diuretic. Externally, a poultice or soak is used to treat athlete's foot, sores, slowhealing wounds, stop bleeding, and insect bites. Gargle with cold infusion or tea to relieve sore throats, inflamed gums, and laryngitis.

agrimony

traditional symbol for gratitude. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 172]

agrimony

1. any of various N temperate rosaceous plants of the genus Agrimonia, which have compound leaves, long spikes of small yellow flowers, and bristly burlike fruits
2. any of several other plants, such as hemp agrimony
References in periodicals archive ?
John's wort, gray-headed coneflower, blue vervain, white vervain, horseweed, oxeye, germander, teasel, fringed loosestrife, velvetleaf, wingstem, sundrops, small-flowered agrimony, bull thistle, tick trefoil, bush clover, burdock, showy and tall coneflower, Jimson weed, pigweed, thin-leafed mountain mint, tick trefoil, downy false foxglove, and three-seeded mercury.
Pick the leaves and flowers of hemp agrimony before the flowers open and harvest the roots of false indigo and coneflower in fall.
Agrimonia parviflora Aiton; Southern, Swamp, or Small-Flowered Agrimony, Harvest-Lice; Moist roadside meadow; Rare; C = 4; BSUH 17489.
Plants to treat of anaemia include agrimony, centuary, barberry, ginger, nettle and yellow dock.
An herbalist/nutritional consultant from Boulder, Colorado presents general guidelines for the use of herbal medicines and profiles of some 180 herbs from agrimony to zedoary.
BARRINGTON COURT: The estate at the Tudorbuilt Barrington Court is excellent for late summer butterflies, which are attracted by the profusion of buddleias, Michaelmas daisies and Hemp Agrimony.
Total Lift Minceur from Clarins claims to put a break on fat formation with plant extracts such as Peruvian creeper and to boost microcirculation with agrimony, all the while toning, firming, hydrating and nourishing the skin with phospholipids.
Many wild flowers are also worth encouraging in the garden - foxgloves, primroses, cowslips, meadow cranesbill, agrimony, knapweed, teasel and campion.
Or try the Bach Flower Remedies, Crab Apple and Agrimony - use a few drops of each under your tongue.
Drilling of the Agrimony and Pepperbush prospects is expected to commence in late December 2002 and January 2003.
Agrimony - a bitter tonic with a beneficial effect on kidneys.