agrimony


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agrimony

(ăg`rĭmō'nē), any plant of the genus Agrimonia, perennials of the family Rosaceae (roserose,
common name for some members of the Rosaceae, a large family of herbs, shrubs, and trees distributed over most of the earth, and for plants of the genus Rosa, the true roses.
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 family) native to north temperate zones, to Brazil, and to Africa. They are found wild in the N and central United States. Agrimony is sometimes cultivated in herb gardens for its small yellow flowers and aromatic leaves, used for an astringent tea. A compound derived from agrimony, agrimophol, is used as an anthelmintic. Agrimony is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rosales, family Rosaceae.
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agrimony

agrimony

Yellow flowers on a stick. Prickly burrs that stick to clothes. Astringent. Leaf tea or cold infusion is used for jaundice and other liver ailments, colds, diarrhea, mouthwash, skin issues, ulcers, diuretic. Externally, a poultice or soak is used to treat athlete's foot, sores, slowhealing wounds, stop bleeding, and insect bites. Gargle with cold infusion or tea to relieve sore throats, inflamed gums, and laryngitis.

agrimony

traditional symbol for gratitude. [Flower Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 172]

agrimony

1. any of various N temperate rosaceous plants of the genus Agrimonia, which have compound leaves, long spikes of small yellow flowers, and bristly burlike fruits
2. any of several other plants, such as hemp agrimony
References in periodicals archive ?
Modern herbalists recommend Agrimony for acid stomach, indigestion, debility of the liver, gall bladder stimulation and disorders, nose-bleed, incontinence, infantile bed-wetting, diarrhoea and promotion of the gastric juices.
John's wort, gray-headed coneflower, blue vervain, white vervain, horseweed, oxeye, germander, teasel, fringed loosestrife, velvetleaf, wingstem, sundrops, small-flowered agrimony, bull thistle, tick trefoil, bush clover, burdock, showy and tall coneflower, Jimson weed, pigweed, thin-leafed mountain mint, tick trefoil, downy false foxglove, and three-seeded mercury.
Also included are agrimony, allspice, apples, basil, bay, bee balm, buckwheat, burdock, caraway, cardamom, catnip, celery, chervil, chives, cloves, cumin, dill, fennel, garlic, horehound, hyssop, lemon balm (also known as melissa), lemongrass, lovage, nutmeg, onions, oregano, parsley, parsnips, rosemary, sage, savory, tarragon, thyme, turmeric, vanilla and yarrow.
I would look closely at her diet and possibly use herbs such as agrimony, which enhance iron absorption, and yellow dock and nettle that are good sources of iron.
But from the air, its traces will surely be seen for ages, and wandering through the meadow that is to replace it, people will be surprised to find corn cockle, vetch, devil's bit scabious, selfheal, agrimony, yarrow, ox-eye daisy and quaking grass: the plants of old England, all strangely gathered within the walls.
Try this bowel tonic as a tea, made from the following: Roman camomile and lemon balm (relaxing, anti-inflammatory); agrimony (digestive tonic) and marigold (healing, anti-fungal).
If a man be too salacious, boil water agrimony in foreign ale, let him drink thereof at night fasting.
The pot calls for two coneflower (Echinacea augustifolia), one false indigo (Baptisia australis), two hemp agrimony (Eupatorium cannibinum), and three pot marigold (Calendula officinalis).
The little conical burs of the agrimony stick to my clothes; the pale lobelia still blooms freshly, and the rough hawk-weed holds up its globes of yellowish fuzzy seeds, as well as the panicled.
The Company also expects drilling to commence on its Pepperbush and Agrimony prospects in the near future.
Above all I recall the smells and colours of a tapestry of herbs which I had never encountered before: marsh St John's-wort in a peaty ditch, marsh cinquefoil and bogbean in pools, and purple loosestrife and hemp agrimony in former peat cuttings, a sign to take care when stepping on what looked like solid ground.
Agrimonia parviflora Aiton; Southern, Swamp, or Small-Flowered Agrimony, Harvest-Lice; Moist roadside meadow; Rare; C = 4; BSUH 17489.