agroecology


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agroecology

[‚ag·rō‚ē′käl·ə·jē]
(agriculture)
The application of ecological knowledge about organism distribution and abundance to enhance crop yields and protect crops from insect or disease attack.
References in periodicals archive ?
One of the key elements in the success of agroecology and food sovereignty in Cuba has been the support of the state.
Millions of small-scale farmers using agroecology techniques over the past 10 years have had remarkable successes, greatly increasing crop yields.
Although as a beekeeper I would prefer to see a shift back to traditional agroecology, this is not a perfect world, and farmers will demand insecticides when their crops are at risk.
Developed nations, however, would be unable to make a quick shift to agroecology because of what he called an "addiction" to an industrial, oil-based model of farming.
As Table 2 shows, the damage to agricultural crops, livestock, irrigation systems, and infrastructure has been substantial, though it has varied across regions due to differences in agroecology and other factors.
Initially, researchers wanted to show how these pests reduced potato yields, but they actually they found yield increases, said Katja Poveda, the study's principal investigator, at the Agroecology Institute of the University of Goettingen, Germany, and the Cornell entomology department.
Miguel Altieri, a professor of agroecology at the University of California, Berkeley, said 180 million ha of genetically altered soybeans, corn, and cotton are grown globally, "but not one of these hectares" is devoted to growing crops that will be used as food.
Hence, we need an ecological paradigm of agriculture, based on biodiversity and agroecology.
The agricultural and forestry techniques taught include innovative, low-tech agroecology methodologies that rely on local, renewable resources to produce a diversity of crops while conserving soils, biodiversity, and ecosystem integrity.
in food systems and social change from the University of California, Santa Cruz, and a certificate in ecological horticulture and organic farming from the UCSC Center for Agroecology and Sustainable Food Systems.
Exploring the Science Behind an Apparent Conflict [Research Brief #10, The Center for Agroecology & Sustainable Food Systems].