ague

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ague

a fever with successive stages of fever and chills esp when caused by malaria
References in periodicals archive ?
He determined that the willow bark was also effective in treating the fever of ague and presented his findings to the Royal Society.
But his real love is for doomed second-rate humanity--its ideals, its agues and its wonderful banality.
The author agues that the two-state solution has been eliminated as a practical solution due to illegal expansion of Jewish settlements that dismembered the West Bank rendering it unfit for a viable and stable state.
As a half-brother to Larkhill Jo (Staplers Jo-Westmead Flight) he brings a cross that has worked well previously with Tina At Last, whose May 2001 litter by Larkhill Jo's son Droopys Kewell included the Northern Oaks heroine Bower Agues and Sussex Puppy Trophy winner Young Deal.
DAVID McKnight BSc MSc has some pretty good scientific credentials and when he agues about global warming (Letters, Tuesday)I suppose we ought to listen to his views.
The fact that it happens to also be an investment in a growing sector, and aligning with one of the leading JSE listed hospital groups agues well for the relationship," he said.
Such mention of agues did not disappear when the coldest years of the Little Ice Age began.
Their sound probes every possibility, one number using only soprano and sopranino horns toying with ear-ringing pitches, another totally spontaneous but still subject to their special vocabulary of instructional hand signals, each player giving his colle agues surprise directions.
He advises readers to avoid thinking of social media only as a marketing tool and agues that the enterprise's social media program should not be managed solely by the marketing department.
McCaw features in a Barbarians side drawn from the cream of the southern hemisphere and captained by South Africa's John Smit, who is joined by six of his 2007 World Cup-winning colle agues.
Michigan-based mathematical psychologist Stokes agues for a view of the self as a field of pure consciousness, and draws unorthodox conclusions about the self and its relations to the physical body and the physical world.
He agues that most misunderstanding of Derrida stems from a failure to read his actual work, and explains some passages that have been important in the reception of his work.