air-raid shelter


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air-raid shelter

[¦er ‚rād ¦shel·tər]
(civil engineering)
A chamber, often underground, provided with living facilities and food, for sheltering people against air attacks.
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References in periodicals archive ?
While all that was left of the Palmers' air-raid shelter was found on the roof of a house in Rhymney Street.
It enjoyed a brief revival as a mushroom farm in 1928 before being used as an air-raid shelter during the Second World War.
Once used as a dormitory air-raid shelter for the cathedral choristers during the Second World War, the space had fallen into disrepair before the benefactor came forward.
Yesterday's search involved specialist teams bringing in mechanical diggers and sniffer dogs to an air-raid shelter near a scrapyard on the site of a former colliery in Acornclose Lane, Sacriston.
The next day we saw that the four houses adjacent to ours had been destroyed and everyone buried in the air-raid shelters.
APPEAL: Edward Donnelly is presumed dead; right, police search an air-raid shelter on Acorn Close Lans
We were just making our way to the air-raid shelter under Gray's store in Bull Street.
APPEAL: Edward Donnelly is presumed dead; HUNT: Police searched an air-raid shelter on Acorn Close Lane
Our students study World War Two in their history lessons and the uncovering of the air-raid shelter and its contents has made the period more 'real' and relevant to them.
I remember my friend's mother rushing out screaming for us to run and practically throwing us down the steps of their air-raid shelter.
The restaurant at Henley College, in Bell Green, was transformed into a 1940s air-raid shelter for two days this month.
Sheets of corrugated steel and a frame of railway sleepers buried with the motor suggest it was used as a makeshift air-raid shelter.