alabaster


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alabaster,

fine-grained, massive, translucent variety of gypsumgypsum
, mineral composed of calcium sulfate (calcium, sulfur, and oxygen) with two molecules of water, CaSO4·2H2O. It is the most common sulfate mineral, occurring in many places in a variety of forms. A transparent crystalline variety is selenite.
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, a hydrous calcium sulfate. It is pure white or streaked with reddish brown. Alabaster, like all other forms of gypsum, forms by the evaporation of bedded deposits that are precipitated mainly from evaporating seawater. It is soft enough to be scratched with a fingernail and hence it is easily broken, soiled, and weathered. Because of its softness, alabaster is often carved for statuary and other decorative purposes. It is quarried in England and also in Italy. Vases and statuettes of Italian alabaster are sold as "Florentine marbles." The term "Oriental alabaster" is a misnomer and actually refers to marblemarble,
metamorphic rock composed wholly or in large part of calcite or dolomite crystals, the crystalline texture being the result of metamorphism of limestone by heat and pressure.
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, a calcium carbonate; whereas gypsum is a calcium sulfate. Important sources of alabaster are Algeria, Egypt, Iran, and Mexico (from which it is exported under the name Mexican onyx); in the United States there are important sources in Utah and Arizona. Oriental alabaster (marble) was extensively used by the Egyptians in sarcophagi, in the linings of tombs, in the walls and ceilings of temples, and in vases and sacrificial vessels. The Romans worked the Algerian and Egyptian quarries and used the stone for similar purposes. In modern times it was used by Muhammad Ali for his mosque in Cairo. The French make extensive use of alabaster in interior decoration.

alabaster

A fine-grained, translucent variety of very pure gypsum, white or delicately shaded, and used for ornamental work.
See also: Stone

alabaster

[′al·ə‚bas·tər]
(mineralogy)
CaSO4·2H2O A fine-grained, colorless gypsum.

alabaster

Fine-grained, translucent variety of very pure gypsum, generally white or delicately shaded.

alabaster

1. a fine-grained usually white, opaque, or translucent variety of gypsum used for statues, vases, etc.
2. a variety of hard semitranslucent calcite, often banded like marble
References in periodicals archive ?
About Andress Engineering Associates: Andress Engineering Associates: Headquartered in Alabaster, Alabama Andress has been a proud Dealer of Trackmobile[R] Mobile Railcar Movers for more than 58 years.
18, 2015 /PRNewswire/ -- Sherwin-Williams announced Alabaster (SW 7008), a hue symbolic of new beginnings, as the 2016 Color of the Year.
Its editor, Heather Alabaster, said: "We're delighted with the new site "It gives us the flexibility to keep everyone better informed and topped up with new information over the year.
This historically important church is home to an 14th Century alabaster tomb chest belonging to Gronw Fychan and his wife Myfanwy, ancestors of the Tudor royal family.
The project consists of seven parts erosion control, mass grading, retaining walls, storm water piping, sanitation and sewer piping and water main relocation that will be completed in three phases, Alabaster City Schools Superintendent Dr.
ENGLISH alabaster was once famed throughout Europe but is no longer mined, which makes the work of contemporary sculptor Vivien Whitaker Arbs - now being exhibited at the Lawrence Batley Theatre in Huddersfield - important both artistically and historically.
The friend said: "Charles wants his women to be porcelain white or have alabaster skin.
Esmatullah Shams, provincial mines department head, said the province was extremely rich in natural resources such as uranium, magnate, carbonate, stucco, zing, plumbum, quicksilver, alabaster and others.
1) However, there is still further to go in challenging the established mindset regarding English artworks from this century, particularly in the case of alabaster carving, where a social and intellectual context has long been underrepresented.
Nearly 1000 fragments of Egyptian and Assyrian alabaster vases are presented in this volume, most treated for the first time.
Alabaster & Wilson was founded by Arthur Alabaster and Thomas Wilson on Vyse Street in the same year as the British Jewellers' Association, and also Queen Victoria's Golden Jubilee celebrations.
Alabaster (collection development coordinator, Phoenix Public Library, retired) guides public librarians in developing a high-quality collection while saving time and money.