aldehyde

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aldehyde

(ăl`dəhīd) [alcohol + New Lat. dehydrogenatus=dehydrogenated], any of a class of organic compounds that contain the carbonyl groupcarbonyl group
, in chemistry, functional group that consists of an oxygen atom joined by a double bond to a carbon atom. The carbon atom is joined to the remainder of the molecule by two single bonds or one double bond.
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, , and in which the carbonyl group is bonded to at least one hydrogen; the general formula for an aldehyde is RCHO, where R is hydrogen or an alkyl or aryl group. Aldehydes are formed by partial oxidation of primary alcohols and form carboxylic acids when they are further oxidized. The common name for an aldehyde is often derived from the name of the acid it forms; the IUPAC name is usually derived from the name of the alcohol from which it is formed. Low molecular weight aldehydes, e.g., formaldehydeformaldehyde
, HCHO, the simplest aldehyde. It melts at −92°C;, boils at −21°C;, and is soluble in water, alcohol, and ether; at STP, it is a flammable, poisonous, colorless gas with a suffocating odor.
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 and acetaldehydeacetaldehyde
or ethanal
, CH3CHO, colorless liquid aldehyde, sometimes simply called aldehyde. It melts at −123°C;, boils at 20.8°C;, and is soluble in water and ethanol.
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, have sharp, unpleasant odors; higher molecular weight aldehydes, e.g., benzaldehydebenzaldehyde
or benzenecarbonal
, C6H5CHO, colorless liquid aldehyde with a characteristic almond odor. It boils at 180°C;, is soluble in ethanol, but is insoluble in water.
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 and furfuralfurfural
or furfuraldehyde
[Lat.,=bran], C4H3OCHO, viscous, colorless liquid that has a pleasant aromatic odor; upon exposure to air it turns dark brown or black. It boils at about 160°C;.
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, have pleasant, often flowery, odors and are found in the essential oilsessential oils,
volatile oils that occur in plants and in general give to the plants their characteristic odors, flavors, or other such properties. Essential oils are found in various parts of the plant body (in the seeds, flowers, bark, or leaves) and are also concentrated in
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 of certain plants. Aldehydes are used for the manufacture of synthetic resins, e.g., bakelite, and for making dyestuffs, flavorings, perfumes, and other chemicals. Some are used as preservatives and disinfectants.

aldehyde

[′al·də‚hīd]
(organic chemistry)
One of a class of organic compounds containing the CHO radical.

aldehyde

1. any organic compound containing the group -CHO. Aldehydes are oxidized to carboxylic acids and take part in many addition reactions
2. consisting of, containing, or concerned with the group -CHO
References in periodicals archive ?
The aldehydic monoterpene citral and the alcoholic citronellol, when they are administered together to the larvae of the nematode at the concentration of 46.
We used three assays to quantify LDL oxidation to better appreciate lipid peroxidation and aldehydic modification of apolipoprotein B-100 (apo B-100) (4,22).
Fruits of the Earth This product was designed with ingredients inspired from the earth Top Note: Aldehydic, Citrus Mid Note: Floral, Green Base Note: Musk
Aldehydic and ketonic acids are converted to their oxime derivatives to stabilize the oxo group before extraction and silylation.
The first fragrance, Couture, is a classic, soft floral with topnotes of Italian bergamot, Egyptian cassie and fresh aldehydic accord.
The kinetics of LDL oxidation is then measured as the formation of conjugated dienes [6], oxysterols [7], and various aldehydic products (thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances) [8] by fluorescence development [9] and by changes of the electrophoretic mobility of apolipoprotein (apo) B100 [10].
It was predictable that aldehydic vanilla would react chemically with the primary amine functionality of glucosamine to form a yellow colored Schiff's base, causing gradual product discoloration, loss of vanilla odor and disappearance of glucosamine.