alewife

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alewife:

see herringherring,
common name for members of the large, widely distributed family Clupeidae, comprising many species of marine and freshwater food fishes, including the sardine (Sardinia), the menhaden (Brevoortia and Ethmidium), and the shad (Alosa).
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alewife

[′āl‚wīf]
(vertebrate zoology)
Pomolobus pseudoharengus. A food fish of the herring family that is very abundant on the Atlantic coast.
References in periodicals archive ?
26) The Good Fellows Consideration includes a stanza that echoes the landlady's abrupt refusal of credit in The Alewives Invitation to Married-Men:
WALLEYE CONNECTION: Dense schools of alewives are a major food source for large predators such as walleyes, trout, and salmon, and an abundance of alewives can make it tough for anglers to compete.
The sound of turning turbines might scare off schools of herring, alewives, and smelts that enter the bay and serve as forage species for larger fish.
Food of alewives, yellow perch, spottail shiners, trout-perch, and slimy and fourhorn sculpins in southeastern Lake Michigan.
Populations of anadromous alewives in the Waterville area were sufficient to briefly support a commercial harvest at the Ft.
Latent survival of impinged individuals varied widely, with several highly abundant species exhibiting better than 50% survivorship, while alewives (Alosa pseudoharengus) and blueback herring (Alosa aestivalis) displayed very high mortality rates after a four-day holding period.
While paddling with his brother on the Concord and Merrimack Rivers in 1839, Thoreau lamented the disappearance of formerly abundant salmon, shad, and alewives.
Haymes and Patrick (1986) excluded alewives from water intakes using low-frequency sounds.
When the first apple and cherry tree leaves become yellow and drift to the ground, alewives head back to sea from their estuaries along the Atlantic.
The state approved the moratorium in response to several years of a steadily declining stock of alewives and blueback herring.
1) While admitting that from the 1590s alehouses run by alewives faced increasing competition from breweries, Brown uncovers a far greater participation of women in this site of popular recreation than has been noted hitherto.