psychiatrist

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psychiatrist

[sə′kī·ə·trəst]
(medicine)
A person who specializes in psychiatry; a licensed physician trained in psychiatry.
References in periodicals archive ?
to be introduced, as it is for an alienist to testify as to the soundness or unsoundness of the mind of a subject.
As a "partial" insanity which left the reasoning faculties (save for the obsession) unharmed, monomania solicited the interpretive power of the alienist.
The prominent alienist Henry Maudsley dismissed the rules as "confused" and "a false inference founded on insufficient observation" of insanity, and declared "they are unanimously condemned by all physicians who have a practical knowledge of the insane.
The Evening Graphic and New York Law Journal quoted in "Gray is Examined by Four Alienists," New York Times, April 15, 1927, p.
For instance, the American alienist Edward Jarvis attributed insanity to "the price we pay for civilization.
No longer were there madhouses, madhouse keepers, madmen and madwomen; there were asylums, proprietors, alienists, and lunatics.
He could have deliberately chosen experts likely to say that the accused had become insane since the beginning of the trial, thereby making him ineligible to be executed, instead, he leaned towards alienists likely to judge Riel sane and so qualified to be hanged .
Three of these men were competent alienists, who were able to diagnose the Bolshevik leaders mentally in the course of their professional duties.
There were alienists, sociologists, prison wardens, prison doctors, the superintendent of a women's reformatory, a statistician, an Episcopal bishop, and lots of lawyers.
Philippe Huneman's "Animal Economy" shows how the ideas of "animal economy" as reflected in the writings of vitalist physicians like Chambaud and Fouquet helped alienists like Pinel and Esquirol form a more scientific (medical and psychological) conception of mental illness, develop new forms of treatment, and eventually generate the new scientist-therapist role of the "psychiatrist.
Their perspectives include orientalism and occidentalism, Adam Smith's ethnographic sources of economic progress, the German Enlightenment and the Pacific, and the rise of psychiatry from the Encyclopedie to the alienists.
17) The designation mad-doctors and even the subsequent alienists indicates the contempt--and apprehension--with which psychiatry was long regarded.