allicin


Also found in: Dictionary, Medical, Wikipedia.

allicin

[′al·ə·sən]
(materials)
An oily liquid extracted from garlic which has a sharp garlic odor; used in medicine as an antibacterial agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
Curcumin, resveratrol, quercetin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), zeaxanthin, oleuropein, and allicin are among the many plant nutrients that benefit human health.
Allicin and other sulphur compounds are thought to be the major antimicrobial factors in garlic.
3 GARLIC contains allicin, an active compound responsible for antibacterial properties, released when chopped or crushed.
Experts at Edinburgh Univesity revealed this week that allicin - which can be extracted by crushing raw garlic - could be an effective treatment against certain bugs.
A compound called allicin provides most of the health benefits of garlic.
Heating immediately after crushing or mincing eliminates the formation of allicin.
It might sound a little unlikely, but there was (some) logic to it: onions contain allicin, a compound, also found in garlic, with infection-fighting qualities, and sulphur, which is believed to boost immune response.
g: allicin) in which their complete removal render garlic to be ineffective against microorganisms (3,14) The odorless amino acid allicin presentin the garlic cloves is metabolized by the enzyme allinase (a cysteine sulfoxide lyase) to allicin and other thiosulfinates, which besides their antimicrobial effects produce) which is a characteristic odor of garlic.
Garlic contains healthy compounds such as sulfur-containing allicin, oligosaccharides, arginine-rich proteins, selenium and flavonoids.
The functions of garlic are mainly attributed to the bioactive components, including sulfur-containing compounds such as alliin, diallylsulphides and allicin (Amagase et al.