allicin


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allicin

[′al·ə·sən]
(materials)
An oily liquid extracted from garlic which has a sharp garlic odor; used in medicine as an antibacterial agent.
References in periodicals archive ?
So far, only bacteria naturally thriving on garlic are reported to resist allicin (Shim & Kyung, 1999).
Lawson and Hughes (1992) demonstrated that allicin is unstable and poorly absorbed from the digestive tract.
Allicin reduces the growth of methaneproducing bacterial colonies in the first of cows' four stomachs.
Allicin isn't present in garlic until it's chopped.
One antifungal supplement he routinely recommends is 100% pure allicin as found in the products Allimax and Al-limed from AlliMax International Ltd.
When cloves are chewed, crushed or cut, they release a sulphur-bearing compound called allicin, the magic ingredient thought to be responsible for garlic's therapeutic qualities.
Further examination showed that the newer lots of garlic powder tablets didn't yield enough allicin, the presumed active ingredient.
For example, allicin --a sulfur- containing compound isolated from garlic oil- inhibits the growth of both gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria.
The most active of these are allicin and thiosulphinate.
The odor comes from allicin, the active ingredient in garlic believed to reduce LDL levels.
Adding onions to a meat substitute brings back a down-home flavor and aroma, and the allicin in onions (and garlic) is linked with a modest but significant benefit in lowering LDL ("bad") cholesterol.
Allicin brings tears to our eyes and usually elicits an anxious "Are you alright?