allometry

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Related to allometric: allometric growth

allometry

[ə′läm·ə·trē]
(biology)
The quantitative relation between a part and the whole or another part as the organism increases in size. Also known as heterauxesis; heterogony.
The quantitative relation between the size of a part and the whole or another part, in a series of related organisms that differ in size.
(mathematics)
A relation between two variables x and y that can be written in the form y = axn, where a and n are constants.
References in periodicals archive ?
Increased body depth in this region indicates significant allometric growth.
A linear, rather than allometric, increase in P mass as body mass increased contradicts previous work.
65) represents fish that become less round as length increases indicating negative allometric growth in the fish.
29 with 115 degrees of freedom indicates that there is no statistically significant allometric effect (Fig.
Allometric Growth of population parameters since 1961 to 2001 has measured by power regression.
To enhance the accuracy of this relationship it is important that allometric equations for secondary forests are created, specified and validated.
Comparing aboveground carbon sequestration between moso bamboo (Phyllostachys heterocycla) and China fir (Cunninghamia lanceolata) forests based on the allometric model.
More detailed analysis of skeletal material from moose may demonstrate if body size reduction in moose follows allometric models, a research area relevant to understanding the evolution of Homo floresiensis, a recent insular homonid that stood barely 1 m tall.
Estimation of population using remote sensing products dates back to the 1960s when Nordbeck (1965) found an exponential relationship between the population and area of urban settlement based on allometric growth models.
Essentially a tree's trunk diameter is recorded at breast height, and allometric equations--which calculate relative growth rates--are then used to estimate carbon accumulation levels over time with normal photosynthetic growth.