allomorphism

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allomorphism

[‚a·lə′mȯr‚fiz·əm]
(mineralogy)
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7) Interestingly, Baydimirova (2010) considers o--and ob(o)--in Russian allomorphs of the same prefix, although they add rather different meanings to some verbs and yield minimal pairs.
The syntactic and semantic differences between the two sets of forms may be illustrated with the following examples from Romanian, in which te is the unstressed and tine the stressed allomorph of the accusative case of the second person singular pronoun.
Nouns of this group regularly attached the allomorph -u in the nominative plural and the accusative plural (cf.
Besides this oscillation in the use of the indicative II in some varieties Of LGA, verbal stems with a final vowel were also inflected either with the allomorph -i, which originally combined with verbal stems ending in a consonant, or with the allomorph -w, which originally occurred with stems ending in a vowel: "ko sekoi ou kosekou" 'here it is'(VPB, p.
The third person non-singular allomorph undergoes changes according to the phonological environments.
The OIA lemma is found in ali NIA branches; however note that allomorphs with an (sometimes aspirated) affricate instead of a sibilant and with o instead of a are limited to the north-west.
1) Following the TAGH-approach [11], we model Croatian morphology by referring exclusively to morphotactic regularities, using morpheme and allomorph sets and regular morphological rules, such that a deterministic finite state transducer (FST) can be generated.
5) The journey of Telemachus is an allomorph of a different, though no less common, tale: that of a young hero, an only son, whose father has for some reason been long absent, who sets out on his first exploits to "win his spurs"; these exploits often entail the youth's searching for his father, rescuing him, and bringing him home.
This analysis suffers from two major shortcomings: first, as is well-known, Dutch -er has an allomorph -aar that surfaces under the same phonological conditions as the long form -aarster in (6a).
52) Here se is an allomorph of le, which is used whenever le is contiguous to a third person accusative clitic.
15) On the basis of research results covering various periods in the history of English as well as studies on varieties of English, they maintain that weren't generalization is a relatively recent process in the history of vernacular English: for instance, Nevalainen's (2006) study shows no attestations of nonstandard were in negative contexts (albeit negative constructions were generally rare) in the Corpus of Early English Correspondence, covering the time span 1410-1681; no nonstandard usages of the negative allomorph at issue were attested in the speech of early British emigrants to New Zealand, either (Hay--Schreier 2004: 228, in Cheshire and Fox 2008: 3).