allopatric


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to allopatric: Allopatric population

allopatric

[¦a·lō¦pa·trik]
(ecology)
Referring to populations or species that occupy naturally exclusive, but usually adjacent, geographical areas.
References in periodicals archive ?
Of additional interest is a clear segregation of generally allopatric species along the ares bordering the western margin of the Pacific Plate; from north to south these are H.
The close morphological similarities between both species suggest a common ancestor for both species and rather recent allopatric speciation events.
Through this reasoning, students can discover for themselves the principle of allopatric speciation and that speciation does not require "special" evolutionary phenomena, just "normal" evolution in isolated populations.
menardi there were three allopatric species involved, one of which occurred in North America, M.
annuum complex that were once allopatric are increasingly sympatric due to movement by man (10).
It has been assumed that pocket gophers have similar niches and that their distributions tend to be allopatric (Best 1973, Blair and Miller 1949, Hansen 1960, Miller 1964, Thornton and Creel 1975, Turner et al.
It certainly seems possible that these two populations could have been allopatric at some time during the two thousand or so years of warmer, dryer weather that occurred in the Middle Holocene.
The frequencies of micronucleated cells from the bone marrow and peripheral blood in both species allowed three types of analyses to be made: the intraspecific sympatric comparisons, where the different types of cells were compared in each species, at the three localities; the intraspecific allopatric comparisons, where the same end point in each species was compared among the three localities; and the interspecific sympatric comparisons for each end point at each locality.
39] The latter reflect allopatric evolution, defined by S.
An ongoing adjunctive behavior can fortuitously branch, an effect akin to allopatric speciation through the operation of the "founder principle" (Mayr, 1970).
a meta-analysis of publications on allopatric versus sympatric speciation
Both of these species are distantly allopatric and have restricted distributions, as is also commonly observed in other species in the genus, e.