alluviation


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.

alluviation

[ə‚lüv·ē′ā·shən]
(geology)
The deposition of sediment by a river.
References in periodicals archive ?
In contrast, the sands and gravels of Terrace 1 were aggraded from the Neolithic onwards with significant fine-grained alluviation commencing in the Bronze Age.
Rather than suggesting the dominance of east-west movement, this pattern probably resulted from the destruction of north-south routes by alluviation, as they probably would have followed the wadi floodplains.
1995) detailed river-history, alluviation and settlement in the Trikala basin (Thessaly), showing that early emmer farmers established permanent villages in floodplains and exploited regular floods that freshened silts for cultivation.
With illustrations from all over the world, there follow chapters on site formation, alluviation (two), surface surveys, and earthquakes (cf.
The complexity of interactions between the Mediterranean environment and its inhabitants is particularly well explored in chapter VII's measured treatment of the Vita-Finzi alluviation debate, and there is an excellent discussion, in chapter IX, of the evidence throughout Mediterranean history for recurrent mobility, not just of goods, but of people.
These hills may have been formed by the accumulation of catastrophic flood alluviation during the Pleistocene.
There was a cessation of alluviation on the fan, a stability in the landscape and the beginning of soil formation as indicated by Soil 2.