allylamine


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allylamine

[¦al·əl·ə¦mēn]
(organic chemistry)
CH2CHCH2NH2 A yellow oil that is miscible with water; boils at 58°C; prepared from mustard oil.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you have a dry scaly process--with or without the collarettes--you're probably better with an allylamine, particularly if you use a keratolytic with it, something that has urea or a lactic acid," she said.
Analytical grade Allylamine and BP used for the surface modification of the rubber powder were procured from Kanto Chemical Co.
naftifine Allylamine, formulated as 1% gel or cream.
Amine groups, for instance, have been introduced by allylamine (19, 20) and diaminocyclohexane (21).
Acrolein is the principal cytotoxic metabolite of the anticancer and arthritis drug cyclophosphamide and is the principal and most physiologically active metabolite of allylamine (15), which is metabolized intracellularly to acrolein via semicarbazide sensitive amine oxidase.
Comparative toxicity of allylamine and acrolein in cultured myocytes and fibroblasts from neonatal rat heart.
Butenafine is the first of a new class of antifungal agents known as the benzylamines, which are chemically and pharmacologically related to the allylamine antifungal drugs.
Moreover, the antifungal drugs available to successfully treat these infections are becoming increasingly limited, with polyenes, allylamines, azoles (e.
Treatment of fungal infections currently available in the market can be broadly classified into four major classes of antifungal drugs - Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins.
GII) is pleased to announce a new market research report, “Antifungals Market to 2017 - Generic Erosion of Major Polyenes, Azoles, Allylamines and Echinocandins to Slow Value Growth” by GBI Research.
Cure rates are higher and treatment courses are shorter with topical fungicidal allylamines, like terbinafine than with fungistatic azoles.