amaranth


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amaranth

(ăm`ərănth') [Gr.,=unfading], common name for the Amaranthaceae (also commonly known as the pigweed family), a family of herbs, trees, and vines of warm regions, especially in the Americas and Africa. The genus Amaranthus includes several widely distributed species called amaranths that are characterized by a lasting red pigment in the stems and leaves. They have been a poetic symbol of immortality from the time of ancient Greece. Amaranthus also includes such weeds as the green amaranth, A. retroflexus, and various species commonly called tumbleweedtumbleweed,
any of several plants, particularly abundant in prairie and steppe regions, that commonly break from their roots at maturity and, drying into a rounded tangle of light, stiff branches, roll before the wind, covering long distances and scattering seed as they go.
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 and pigweedpigweed,
name for several weedy plants, particularly the common pigweed or lamb's-quarters of the family Chenopodiaceae (goosefoot family), the rough pigweed, or green amaranth, of the related family Amaranthaceae (amaranth family), and the winged pigweed, a tumbleweed.
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, as well as several cultivated plants—e.g., love-lies-bleeding, or tassel flower, and Joseph's coat. Other ornamentals in the family are the globe amaranth (genus Gomphrenia), sometimes called bachelor's button, and the cockscomb (Celosia), both originally tropical annuals. They can be preserved dry and are used in everlastingeverlasting
or immortelle
, names for numerous plants characterized by papery or chaffy flowers that retain their form and often their color when dried and are used for winter bouquets and decorations.
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 bouquets. Amaranth is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Caryophyllales.
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amaranth
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amaranth

amaranth

Many varieties found all over the world. Super nutritious and healthy. Whole plant is edible. Can be eaten raw or steamed. Better tasting than spinach. Has greenish, sometimes purplish colored flowers, red stem. Seeds are a world famous grain and food supply used by the Aztecs. Can be made into flour, or put into smoothies etc. Amaranth seed is high in protein, especially lysine and methionine, two essential amino acids that are not often found in grain. Very hardy plant, difficult to kill. An awesome food source. Used for stomach flu, diarrhea, gastroenteritis, excessive menstruation. Seeds better if soaked overnight. Roots can be roasted or boiled as potato alternative. Do not consume if pregnant or lactating. Toxic lookalike- hairy nightshade, whose leaves look the same but stem is hairy and has white nightshade flower.

amaranth

[′am·ə·ranth]
(botany)
An annual plant (seldom perennial) of the genus Amaranthus that is distributed worldwide in warm and humid regions and is distinguished by small chaffy flowers (arranged in dense, green or red, monoecious or dioecious inflorescences) and by dry, membranous, indehiscent, one-seeded fruit.

amaranth

any of numerous tropical and temperate plants of the genus Amaranthus, having tassel-like heads of small green, red, or purple flowers: family Amaranthaceae
References in periodicals archive ?
Interference of redroot pigweed (Amaranthus retroflexus), Palmer amaranth (A.
The moisture content of grain amaranth flour (GAF) was found to be lower than that of the refined maize flour (RMF), and all the maize-amaranth flour blends (RA1, RA2 and RA3).
Results showed that in cotton fields infested with Palmer amaranth, there was a financial advantage to tilling during the first year because of the immense weed pressure.
This feature is important for the grain industry: larger grains are more in demand for the production of Mexican traditional sweets such as alegrias, a combination of popped amaranth grains, honey and molasses shaped into a bar known as palanqueta.
The highest average length and weight of catfish was obtained with the green-red amaranth (20.
Adding sodium stearoyl lactylate to the biscuits along with soy milk, amaranth and chia seeds generated a product with a high-value protein profile and good physical characteristics, while at the same time not affecting batter rheology.
AMARANTH BREAKFAST BOWL 1/2 cup dry amaranth 1 cup almond milk or coconut milk 1 cup water 2 Tbsp chopped walnuts, almonds, sunflower seeds, or pecans 1/2 cup diced pear or plum, or pomegranate seeds Dash of cinnamon, nutmeg, cloves, or ginger [ILLUSTRATION OMITTED] 1.
Kinetic studies indicated that adsorption of Amaranth dye from aqueous medium by Pisum sativum peels and Arachis hypogaea shells followed pseudo-seconder order kinetics.
The American Diabetes Association Research Foundation recently received a donation of $505,623 from the Amaranth Diabetes Foundation (ADF).
The charity they support is the Amaranth Diabetes Foundation.
Ancient grains--aptly named for their long history of traditional use--constitute a broad category that includes amaranth, farro, freekeh, spelt, barley, millet, teff and others.