Ambient temperature


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Acronyms, Wikipedia.

ambient temperature

[′am·bē·ənt ′tem·prə·chər]
(physics)
The temperature of the surrounding medium, such as gas or liquid, which comes into contact with the apparatus.

Ambient temperature

The temperature of the surrounding air or other medium.

ambient temperature

The temperature of the surrounding air.
References in periodicals archive ?
Antibody titer against Newcastle disease (ND) of different broiler strains reared under thermo neutral (TN) and high ambient temperature (HAT) zones.
Another option is to use a temperature sensor well coupled to the skin and a second temperature sensor to measure ambient temperature.
Considering the resource management issues involved in jute processing including the ease of processing in small operations this study is focused on performing both bleaching and dyeing at ambient temperature without using thermal energy or sacrificing product quality.
Ambient temperature exceeded 14[degrees]C for 50% of the time at the weather station in Isabella from 15 June-15 October, 2009 (Fig.
Constant ambient temperature assumes interior ambient temperature is 22[degrees]C (71.
Concludes Terry Booke, Quality Control Manager at A1 Bacon, 'The Explorer Radio Software and the wireless mesh data logging system means that we can keep in control of ambient temperatures with little management intervention.
The null hypothesis, H0, that there is no significant difference between the mean values of the parameters in tomatoes ripened under field ripening and those ripened under ambient temperature was tested against the alternative hypothesis, [H.
For maximum cooling, the system would need to operate at 100% of the maximum trim pressure to provide cooling for maximum heat rejection at maximum ambient temperature.
Mean ([+ or -] 1 SE) ambient temperature ([degrees]C), snake body temperature ([degrees]C), and thermoregulatory effectiveness ([d.
The minutes also seemingly claim the ambient temperature shall be taken solely from the timing monitors.
They were kept at ambient temperature for three days.
Anesthesiologists Gian Paolo Volpato and Fumito Ichinose and their colleagues at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston recently confirmed the Seattle findings: Both heart rate and respiration rate in lab mice fell by more than half, and body temperature plunged to barely above ambient temperature when the animals were exposed to hydrogen sulfide.