ambiguity

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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
is the prime example and a case in point: The statistical ambiguities in the system backfired and forced a massively expensive single-case clean-up.
The political ambiguities are most evident in choreographed mass performance, which became an immensely popular genre.
Deeply immersed in prior scholarship in the field, Maxwell takes great care to interrogate established opinion, pointing out contradictions, ambiguities, and outright errors in earlier arguments-- always with an eye to demonstrating how the dynamics of African American literary production during this period resist easy classification and codification.
Speech Act Theory (Austin 1962, Searle 1969, Searle 1979, De Bruyn 1995) provides a possible framework for analyzing some pragmatic ambiguities, such as may be found in (35):
The preamble to the regulations acknowledges the need to clarify certain ambiguities in existing Treas.
To make the penned message easier to read, much of the alphabet was redesigned to eliminate ambiguities.
Particularly lucid is Mendez-Clark's examination of the ambiguities created by the superposition of the three points of view in the novel--the storekeeper's, the nurse's, and the chambermaid's--and how these support and/or contradict one another.
Instead, complexity may be to do primarily with statistical richness of information and the many-sided nature of perception and not at all to do with the play of contradictions and ambiguities.
Torp and Sage (2002) indicate that problem-based learning provides an organized, structured process where a hypothesis-driven reasoning is used to adjust to ambiguities (Visser, 2003).
of Oklahoma) delineates the ambiguities of Sutter's life in the context of the ambiguities of the American conquest of the West.
It also acknowledges Kant while undercutting him, functioning as homage while unmasking the ambiguities of language, and positioning Gallo as both heir and pretender.
Thus, the plays accurately reflect the ambiguities and ambivalences of the military writings.