ambiguity


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ambiguity

[‚am·bə′gyü·əd·ē]
(electronics)
The condition in which a synchro system or servosystem seeks more than one null position.
(navigation)
The condition in which navigation coordinates derived from a navigational instrument define more than one point, direction, line of position, or surface of position.

Ambiguity

Delphic oracle
ultimate authority in ancient Greece; often speaks in ambiguous terms. [Gk. Hist.: Leach, 305]
Iseult’s vow
pledge to husband has double meaning. [Arth. Legend: Tristan]
Loxias
epithet of Apollo, meaning “ambiguous” in reference to his practically uninterpretable oracles. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmer-man, 26]
Pooh-Bah
different opinion for every one of his offices. [Br. Opera: The Mikado, Magill I, 591–592]
References in periodicals archive ?
This study examines the relationship between the Five Factor Model of Personality with the three dimensions of role stress namely role conflict, role ambiguity and role overload.
Hypothesis 1(b): There will be a positive relationship between neuroticism and role ambiguity.
Various people have said that ambiguity is a problem for communication," Ted Gibson, senior author of the study, said.
We focus on two basic predictions from ambiguity models.
The ambiguity of the sublime is inevitably bound up with the challenge to assimilate the new.
the process of perceiving, interpreting, and reacting) with ambiguous situations works to determine one's tolerance for ambiguity (TFA) level (Stoycheva, 2002; 2003).
A line of reasoning can apply to all of literature and ambiguity as forms of the same dichotomy.
In addition to the above framework, Beauchamp and Bray (2001) demonstrated that an athlete could experience role ambiguity while engaged in either offensive on-field activities or defensive on-field activities.
The argument made here is that hierarchical level influences both the degree of accountability employees experience, as well as the amount of ambiguity or uncertainty present in their jobs.
Chen is less persuasive, however, in arguing for the continuation of strategic ambiguity.
In this article, we explore the effects of risk aversion and ambiguity aversion on mortality risk modeling and pricing.
In the real world, decisions under uncertainty often involve only vague probabilities, making ambiguity aversion a possible cause for observed market phenomena which are anomalies from the point of view of expected utility theory.