amblyopia


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amblyopia

[am′blē′ōp·ē·ə]
(medicine)
Dimness of vision, especially that not due to refractive errors or organic disease of the eye; may be congenital or acquired.
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Although there were always dissenters to the view that amblyopia had to be treated early (some from the research community, but mainly clinicians who claimed that they had evidence that amblyopia was treatable in adulthood), the overwhelmingly accepted view was that seven or eight years represented the upper age limit for treating amblyopia.
A disorder of binocular vision and with the way that the brain interprets information as it suppresses or ignores signals to one or other of the eyes, amblyopia can lead to permanent loss of vision in the weaker eye if left untreated.
Because brain plasticity declines rapidly with age, early diagnosis and treatment of amblyopia is vital, neuroscientist Elizabeth M.
A study in the journal Pediatrics found that as many as one-third of children who received a late diagnosis for amblyopia had been screened as preschoolers.
Keywords: Amblyopia, Captain Lazy eye, vision training, Ideabus.
Gianna's Story After failing her vision screening in the spring of 2013, a pediatric ophthalmologist diagnosed four-year-old Gianna Balke with amblyopia.
An estimated one in 50 children have amblyopia, and the traditional treatment was to patch the good eye to force the lazy eye to work.
Amblyopia affects about four percent of the general population and is thought to develop when the two eyes do not see equally well in early life, as the connections from the eyes to visual areas in the brain are still being refined.
Amblyopia - derived from the Greek word for "dullness of vision" - afflicts 2 percent to 3 percent of American children.
Ideally, says Blechman, amblyopia should be detected and treated when a child is 3 or 4 years old - not exactly an age when children are particularly patient or good at following directions.
At the seminar, Miller reported on a computerized method of image analysis that detects amblyopia in very young children.
Amblyopia affects about 5 percent of children nationwide.