Amboina

(redirected from amboyna)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Amboina:

see AmbonAmbon
, island, c.300 sq mi (775 sq km), E Indonesia, one of the Moluccas, in the Banda Sea. It is mountainous, well watered, and fertile. Corn and sago are produced, and hunting and fishing supplement the diet.
..... Click the link for more information.
, Indonesia.

Amboina

1. an island in Indonesia, in the Moluccas. Capital: Amboina. Area: 1000 sq. km (386 sq. miles)
2. a port in the Moluccas, the capital of Amboina island
References in periodicals archive ?
Many of our customers select it for use with woods like walnut and curly maple or with narrah and amboyna burl.
The 18th Earl of Derby exchanged his Amboyna, a Bois Roussel half-sister to Alycidon, for Elisabeth Couturie's Gradisca, whose dam was a half-sister to the noted sire Rialto.
Napa leather, nubuck leather, suede and everything from cherry to burl walnut to amboyna wood can be specified during the ordering process.
There is perhaps no spot in the world richer in marine productions, corals, shells and fishes, than the harbour of Amboyna.
The action of Amboyna, a propaganda play designed to stir up anti-Dutch feeling at the time of the Third Dutch War (1672-4), is based on a massacre of Englishmen in the East Indies in 1623.
A few sales of Amboyna cloves reported at an advance of 20 cents on the Company's last sale prices.
The astonishing Amboyna Burl wood handle matches perfectly.
His company deals mainly with the hard-to-find veneers, including amboyna burl and thuya burl.
The base is made of rippled walnut and amboyna, inset with marquetry of acanthus in satinwood (sand-burnt for three-dimensional effect), which was done by a Welsh firm, Anita Marquetry.
Three wood trims are offered: cherry, burl walnut and amboyna, a reddish-brown species from Indonesia.
The chapter on Dryden's Amboyna offers a more convincing account of how the seventeenth-century English theater stages India and "converts it into nature, into the trade wind that is to blow the English colonialists onto English shores they alone were destined to possess" (236).
In the second section, the other absolute metaphors mediate respectively the production of colonialism itself as "an object of knowledge" (185) with the audience as its subject in John Fletcher's Island Princess (1621) and the equivocal confirmation-by-denial of the culture of commercial exchange in Dryden's Amboyna (1673).