amebiasis

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amebiasis:

see dysenterydysentery
, inflammation of the intestine characterized by the frequent passage of feces, usually with blood and mucus. The two most common causes of dysentery are infection with a bacillus (see bacteria) of the Shigella group, and infestation by an ameba,
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amebiasis

[‚am·ē′bī·ə·səs]
(medicine)
A parasitic disease of humans caused by the ameba Entamoeba histolytica, characterized by clinical-pathological intestinal manifestations, including an acute dysentery phase. Also known as amebic dysentery.
References in periodicals archive ?
Berberine is a botanic drug in clinic to treat severe diarrhoea, amoebiasis, cholera and intestinal infections, has been admitted as Huangliansu in Chinese Pharmacopeia (Yang et al.
Patients with intestinal amoebiasis are usually asymptomatic, but it can lead to colitis, abscess formation, perforation and rarely a tumour-like mass in the colon termed an amoeboma.
Minocycline was originally developed to treat a wide array of diseases such as susceptible bacterial infections of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms and is currently recommended for the treatment of anthrax (inhalational, cutaneous, and gastrointestinal), moderate-to-severe acne, meningococcal (asymptomatic) carrier state, Rickettsial diseases (including Rocky Mountain spotted fever, Q fever), nongonococcal urethritis, gonorrhoea, acute intestinal amoebiasis, respiratory tract infection, skin/soft tissue infections, and chlamydial infections (1-3).
Amoebiasis, an occupational disease of workers; Nouv Presse Med, 1980; 9 : 532-533.
The treatment of chronic intestinal amoebiasis with the alkaloids of Holarrhena antidysenterica (kurchi).
Parasites not confined to the skin include onchocerciasis, loiasis, the guinea worm, schistosomiasis, cutaneous amoebiasis and the cutaneous involvement in trypanosomiasis.
We are also grateful to: Mr J M P Fraser, then Deputy Director, Regional Laboratory Services; the Heads of the Regional Laboratory Services; the Control Technologists-In-Charge of all the participating KZN laboratories; Professor T F H G Jackson and the Amoebiasis Research Unit staff, MRC; Mrs Natashia Morris, Health GIS Centre, Malaria Research Programme, MRC; and Dr David Katerere, PROMEC unit, MRC.
Cross-reactions can occur as a consequence of latent and post-infectious diseases prevalent in the tropics namely tuberculosis, pneumonia, amoebiasis, rickettsial diseases, rheumatoid arthritis and chronic active hepatitis (38).
Microscopy, PCR and ELISA applied to the epidemiology of amoebiasis in Greece.