Amorpha


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Amorpha

 

false indigo, a genus of shrubs and semishrubs of the family Leguminosae. Its leaves are odd-pinnate and compound; its flowers are in clusters or panicles, small, and mostly violet, purple, or white with a corolla in which only the large superior (posterior) petal flag is developed while the other petals are reduced. There are about 20 species in North America. Many of them are cultivated in the botanical gardens of the USSR. Amorpha fruticosa, a shrub not over 4 m tall with purple-blue leaves 7 to 15 cm long arranged in panicles, is grown as an ornamental.

REFERENCE

Derev’ia i kustarniki SSSR, vol. 4. Moscow-Leningrad, 1958. Page 135.
References in periodicals archive ?
We did not find any grazed Amorpha, therefore n = 10 for this species in our analyses (five burned, five unburned).
One composite sample was analyzed for each species in each treatment--burned/grazed, burned/ungrazed, unburned/ungrazed, and unburned/grazed (with the exception of Amorpha, for which grazed individuals were not collected).
There was no difference in grazing between burned and unburned plots for Desmodium or Amorpha (P = 0.
However, there was no significant relationship between distance from the woods and average percent grazed for Amorpha (P = 0.
Considering only the main effect of species, Amorpha had a significantly greater concentration of the recalcitrant C fraction compared to other species, while D.
i] and average percent grazed varied greatly: highly preferred Desmodium exhibited an average of 39% of stems grazed while on average only 2% of Amorpha exhibited herbivore damage.
1998) and since grazing events were so infrequent we are unable to hypothesize which herbivores are responsible for Amorpha grazing.
Amorpha had a C:N ratio and %N similar to that of Desmodium but had a significantly higher proportion of recalcitrant C, which likely offset the relatively high N content in terms of herbivore digestibility.
In the savanna, abundance of Amorpha was not significantly higher in plots with nutrients added [ILLUSTRATION FOR FIGURE 3D OMITTED] (F = 0.
This largely reflected a greater abundance of Lathyrus and Amorpha in the savanna.
Such differences in traits might explain why Lespedeza and Amorpha responded differently than Lathyrus to non-nitrogen nutrient addition and protection from herbivores.
SC/NM 0 N A D SuF FABACEAE Amorpha canescens Pursh SC/NM 6 N S U Su Amorpha fruticosa L.