ampelopsis


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ampelopsis

(ăm'pĭlŏp`səs) [Gr.,=looking like a vine], botanic name for woody ornamental vines of the genus Ampelopsis, but in horticulture also traditionally applied to the Virginia creeperVirginia creeper,
native woody vine (Parthenocissus quinquefolia) of the family Vitaceae (grape family), tall growing and popular as a wall covering in the temperate United States.
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, Boston ivyBoston ivy
or Japanese ivy,
tall-climbing woody vine (Parthenocissus tricuspidata) from East Asia, one of the most popular of city wall coverings. Of the same genus as the Virginia creeper and sometimes called ampelopsis, it climbs by disk-tipped tendrils and
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, and others of related genera of the family Vitaceae (grapegrape,
common name for the Vitaceae, a family of mostly climbing shrubs, widespread in tropical and subtropical regions and extending into the temperate zones. The woody vines, or lianas, climb by means of tendrils, which botanically are adaptations of terminal buds.
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 family). Species of Ampelopsis native to Asia and North America have showy berries of various colors. The pepper-vine (A. arborea) is indigenous to the S United States. Ampelopsis is classified in the division MagnoliophytaMagnoliophyta
, division of the plant kingdom consisting of those organisms commonly called the flowering plants, or angiosperms. The angiosperms have leaves, stems, and roots, and vascular, or conducting, tissue (xylem and phloem).
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, class Magnoliopsida, order Rhamnales, family Vitaceae.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ampelopsis AMPE heterophylla Blume Vitis inconstans Miq.
An unusual ``self-sticking'' vine - it does not need help in climbing a wall or fence - that Massoth recommends for the Valley is Ampelopsis brevipedunculata ``Elegans,'' with pink, white and green variegated leaves that turn red in winter, and berries that change color from lilac to shocking blue.
Other vines encountered are Ampelopsis arborea (peppervine), Berchemia scandens (Alabama supplejack), Campsis radicans (trumpet creeper), Cocculus carolinus (Carolina coralbead), Lonicera japonica (Japanese honeysuckle), Parthenocissus quinquefolia (Virginia creeper), Smilax bona-nox (saw greenbrier), Smilax glauca (cat greenbr ier), Smilax rotundifolia (roundleaf greenbrier), Vitis rotundifolia (muscadine), and the ubiquitous Toxicodendron radicans (eastern poison ivy).
Species in this category include some of the characteristic trees, shrubs, and woody vines of the eastern North American deciduous forest and particularly elements of the Coastal Plain forest, such as Ampelopsis arborea (pepper-vine), Celtis laevigata (Texas sugarberry), Cissus incisa (ivy treebine), Erythrina herbacea (coral bean), Phoradendron tomentosum (mistletoe), Quercus virginiana (live-oak), and Ulmus crassifolia (cedar elm) (Benson, 1979; MacRoberts, 1984).
Castanea alnifolia, Diospyros virginiana, Prunus serotina, Crataequs spathulata, Chionanthus virginica, Ilex decidua, Parthenocissus quinquefolia, Acer saccharum, Ilex opaca, Cercis canadensis, Forestiera ligustrina, Quercus nigra, Ampelopsis arborea, Bignonia capreolata, Smilax smallii, Celtis laevigata, Prunus umbellata, Acer rubrum, Smilax bonanox, Vitis mustangesis, Smilax glauca, Asimina parviflora.