amperometry


Also found in: Medical.

amperometry

[‚am·pə′rä·me·trē]
(physical chemistry)
Chemical analysis by techniques which involve measuring electric currents.
References in periodicals archive ?
Double layer capacitance effects can lead to increased background signals in amperometry, lowering S/N.
2] partial pressure ([MATHEMATICAL EXPRESSION NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII]) is measured by amperometry on the blood gas instrument and should not be affected by the hemoglobin status.
Services include GPC, refractive index, UV, fluorescence, ELS, conductivity, amperometry, and diode-array detection.
Various electrodeposited conducting polymers have been utilized to modify working electrodes in amperometry and voltammetry in order to use them in enantioselective uptake studies.
evoked catecholamine release using carbon fiber microelectrode amperometry from isolated chromaffin cells and PC12 cells as described previously (Westerink and Vijverberg 2002).
17], polarography [18], potentiometry [19] amperometry [20,21] amperometric biosensor [22] and fiber optic sensors [23,24].
Examples of topics covered include presynaptic regulation of extracellular dopamine as studied by continuous amperometry in anesthetized animals; fast scan cyclic voltammetry of dopamine and serotonin in mouse brain slices; determining serotonin and dopamine uptake rates in synaptosomes using high-speed chronoamperometry; biophysical properties of brain extracellular space explored in ion-selective microelectrodes, integrative optical imaging, and related techniques; principles, development, and applications of self-referencing electrochemical microelectrodes to the determination of fluxes at cell membranes; telemetry for biosensor systems; and in vivo fast-scan cyclic voltammetry of dopamine near microdialysis probes.
Amperometry is a technique where the output of the sensor is current, which is measured by applying a constant potential between the working and reference electrodes.
An alternative method enabled direct measurement of the renal markers by pulsed amperometry for the detection of nitrogen-containing compounds and more easily oxidized uric acid (47).