amphoterism


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amphoterism

(ăm'fətĕr`ĭzm), in chemistry, the property of certain substances of acting either as acids or as bases depending on the reaction in which they are involved. Many hydroxide compounds are amphoteric. For example, aluminum hydroxide, Al(OH)3, reacts as a base with common acids to form salts, e.g., with sulfuric acid, H2SO4, to form aluminum sulfate, Al2(SO4)3. It reacts as an acid with strong bases to form aluminates, e.g., with sodium hydroxide, NaOH, to form sodium aluminate, Na[Al(OH)4(OH2)2]. Organic molecules that contain both acidic (e.g., carboxyl) and basic (e.g., amino) functional groupsfunctional group,
in organic chemistry, group of atoms within a molecule that is responsible for certain properties of the molecule and reactions in which it takes part. Organic compounds are frequently classified according to the functional group or groups they contain.
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 are usually amphoteric.

amphoterism

[am′fäd·ə‚riz·əm]
(chemistry)
The property of being able to react either as an acid or a base.