ampulla

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ampulla

1. Anatomy the dilated end part of certain ducts or canals, such as the end of a uterine tube
2. Christianity
a. a vessel for containing the wine and water used at the Eucharist
b. a small flask for containing consecrated oil
3. a Roman two-handled bottle for oil, wine, or perfume

ampulla

[am′pu̇l·ə]
(anatomy)
A dilated segment of a gland or tubule.
(botany)
A small air bladder in some aquatic plants.
(invertebrate zoology)
The sac at the base of a tube foot in certain echinoderms.
References in periodicals archive ?
This electrosensory system, comprising many individual ampullae of Lorenzini, is used to detect minute electrical impulses for detection of prey and may also provide geolocation information (Murray, 1962; Kalmijn, 1982; Klimley, 2002).
The timing and the number of semen analyses required to confirm the success of vasectomy remain controversial because of variable clearance times of residual sperm from the seminal vesicles and ampullae of the vasa deferentia.
Silver ampullae are described in a rare splurge of enthusiastic labelling as having been important in the spread of Christian imagery but the images themselves are totally obscured by the positioning and lighting.
The superovulated mice were killed 11 or 15 h after hCG injection according to experimental design, and the mature follicles in the ovary or the oviductal ampullae were ruptured in M2 to release the CEOs.
Electroreceptive animals have a special network of gel-filled sensors called the Ampullae of Lorenzini.
Physical labyrinthectomy is a surgical procedure in which the surgeon removes the inner ear contents, especially the utricle and attached ampullae.
Zooids not divided into body regions; vascular 10 ampullae present in tunic Zooids divided into two or three distinct 13 regions; vascular ampullae absent in tunic 10.
The salty brew of glycoproteins fills hundreds of electrosensory canals, called ampullae, that connect skin pores to subsurface nerve cells in sharks, skates, and rays.
It includes not only generous annotations, but also two appendices (one on ampullae portraying Thecla, another on the popularity of Thecla as a woman's name in late antique Egypt), over thirty pages of maps and photographs, and a full bibliography.
The Shark POD was designed to stimulate gel-filled organs - known as ampullae of Lorenzini - that detect electrical fields, and other sensors that detect vibration.
Oil from the lamps which burned at this site was highly prized by pilgrims as an eulogia or "blessing," and they carried it away in small metal phials known as ampullae.