ampullary organ

ampullary organ

[¦am·pyə‚ler·ē ′ȯr·gən]
(physiology)
An electroreceptor most sensitive to direct-current and low-frequency electric stimuli; found over the body surface of electric fish and also in certain other fish such as sharks, rays, and catfish.
References in periodicals archive ?
An ampullary organ consisting of a 3-cm length of canal with ampulla, innervated by a 5-mm length of afferent nerve, was excised from live, anesthetized skates (Raja erinacea and Raja ocellata).
Additionally, the temporal pattern of the measurable responses of identified electrosensory ALLN afferents varied depending upon the location and orientation of the ampullary organ canal and epidermal pore.
Ampullary organs opening through caudally directed canals to pores located upon the caudal surface of the pectoral fin showed the greatest responses (Figs.
Invariably, the reafference produced by discharge of the electric organ is much weaker than that generated by ventilation; the maximal response of the most caudally directed ampullary organs drives the fibers through less than 10% of their dynamic range.